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Preserving your home’s "good bones" | Home protection tips with HGTV’s Mina Starsiak Hawk – CBS News 8

Posted: August 19, 2020 at 9:59 pm

For many people, owning a home is the biggest investment theyll ever make, which his why protecting it is so important. Sponsored by Terminix.

SAN DIEGO COUNTY, Calif Mina Starsiak Hawk manages to make rehabbing houses look fun and easy with her mom on their hit HGTV show Good Bones. It may seem exciting to buy run-down properties, gut them and turn them into showpieces of the community, but there are many challenges.

Mina gives our Laura Cavanaugh the inside scoop on this season of HGTVs Good Bones and a new project in development with her family.

For many people, owning a home is the biggest investment theyll ever make, which his why protecting it is so important.

Mina Starsiak Hawk is teaming up with Terminix to explain why protecting the Good Bones of any home from termites and other critters is an essential part of maintaining or remodeling. As it heats up and the temperatures continue to rise in San Diego, so does termite activity.

Termites damage more than 600,000 homes a year. They are particularly problematic in Americas Finest City. In fact, San Diego ranks among the top 20 cities whose households required termite services. Mina shares what homeowners can do to fight back, signs to look for and proactive steps they can take to reduce the risk of a termite infestation.

And it all starts with a thorough home inspection. To schedule your free home inspection, you can call 1-800-TERMINIX or visit terminix.com

This segment is sponsored by Terminix.

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Houses are influencers now, and this one burned to the ground – The Verge

Posted: at 9:59 pm

Use your imagination when you look at Louise. Yes, the 170-year-old Georgia home has peeled paint, shattered windows, missing shingles, and termites in its walls. But if you can picture it, Louise could be glorious. Laine and Kevin Berry knew Louises grand potential when they bought the house in March for $15,000 after years of eyeing the property. This isnt a dilapidated home destined to be torn down, they say, but rather a historical anomaly. A preserved Gothic Victorian house that shines precisely because it hasnt been remodeled.

Everything was there, Laine tells me. It was all there. It just needed to be saved, and so that made it really, really special.

The Berrys have seen this potential before. Louise is their sixth baby, as Laine calls the homes, and their most recent restoration project. In only four months, they solidified the houses foundation, refilled the brickwork, and replaced the roof, all in an effort to restore Louise to its original state. They were just about to start working on wiring in the home, in fact, when disaster struck: a lightning bolt hit an oak tree behind Louise and set fire to both the tree and the house. The result looked like something out of a horror movie, a raging inferno that consumed the entire home. Louise is now a husk of its former self.

Its unimaginable that that is what happened, Laine says. I think its everybodys nightmare to lose their house to a fire. But I dont think anybody, even if we think about losing our houses to fire, we dont even consider lightning as a possibility. Even more unbelievable, she adds, is that the last owner of the home, who refused to sell for years, died only a week before the fire.

It almost felt like, cosmically, she was not going to let it go.

Imagination cant save Louise now, although a community of old home appreciators whove been following the houses restoration on Instagram wishes it could. Theyve rallied around Louise, sharing the houses story across social media, supporting the Berrys GoFundMe, and leaving encouraging comments about how much they enjoyed watching the houses journey. Some of the more than 66,000 followers have asked how much itd cost to rebuild Louise ($1.3 million) and wondered if they could raise that much cash.

If all of your followers donated 25 dollars we could raise 1.6 million, one commenter noted. But Laine and her husband dont specialize in new builds. Their interest is in saving existing but neglected properties from ruin.

The online restoration community has been growing for years, fueled by accounts that share homes in need of saving. (Saving a home is the communitys preferred term for buying and fixing an old building. The idea is to never tear down a worthy place and, really, not to flip them, either.) Among the most popular are @savingoldhouses, which has 90,000 followers, and @cheapoldhouses, an account with more than a million followers. Elizabeth Finkelstein started Cheap Old Houses in 2016 after launching a popular column on her website, Circa, that listed 10 homes under $50,000. She eventually needed a place to put all of the extra listings, so came the Instagram account.

The posts are simple. They dont go through restoration tips or processes but instead focus more on real estate listings. Each post depicts a home with its location and price written on the first slide. Finkelstein doesnt profit off the homes listings, but she does offer specialized newsletter subscriptions, sells space on Circa to list homes, and operates a merch store to make money. Most listings cost less than $100,000 on Cheap Old Houses, and for Finkelstein, the more preserved it is, the better.

I almost find [the homes] more alluring if theyre not in great condition but theyre original, she says. People love time warp, time capsule, houses that you open up and it looks like it hasnt been touched.

During the pandemic, she says the account has, at times, grown by 25,000 people a week, demonstrating everyones collective desire to get outside their homes, find a project, or at least imagine themselves somewhere other than wherever theyre hunkered down.

Once a home sells, Finkelstein posts another image, but this time with the words IVE BEEN SAVED across it. The homes buyer will often launch their own Instagram account so that fans can follow along with the renovations. Louise was one of those homes, and Finkelstein says after she posted about the fairytale house, the Berrys gained around 30,000 Instagram followers.

Theyre Insta stars because I think people love to kind of follow along, she says. I do think my feed is made up mostly of dreamers and people who are like, Wow, I would love to do that. And to see someone actually take it on and do it, its so fun just to feel like you know the whole story.

The end goal for many property owners is to either live in their home or turn it into a bed and breakfast or rental. The Berrys, for instance, live in one of their homes and operate the others as Airbnbs. They only sold one property that was too far away to manage. Louise was supposed to become a bed and breakfast.

Whatever they turn into, the goal is to maintain these homes and keep them as historically accurate as possible.

Were losing these properties at incredible rates, so our objective has been to come into areas and restore properties that, for whatever purpose, have been neglected for several years, says Laine, whos working on getting a certification in historic preservation from the Boston College of Architecture.

Another popular restoration journey, @whathavewedunoon from Cal Hunter and Claire Segeren, is supposed to end up as both a permanent home and an Airbnb. Hunter went to an auction in 2018 to buy an apartment in Glasgow, Scotland, and accidentally bid on the wrong unit. Instead of a place in a major city that needed manageable work, they ended up with an apartment in a town called Dunoon, an hour and a half away from Glasgow. The building was in extreme disrepair when it rained, it rained inside the house. The roof looked like a colander with holes along the ceiling, and, critically, it needed serious structural work. A structural engineer told the couple to give up and start fresh. The building had been abandoned for 30 years already.

Cal was excited from the very start, and he just kept saying, Oh, its just sticks and stones; we can deal with any of the problems that the building has for us, Segeren says. Hunter, whos a carpenter, felt more optimistic about the project at first.

The first couple months were overwhelming for me, she says. It was like a roller coaster back then. Thered be one minute where youd be excited and thought, You know, this is a great thing for us to be doing, and then the next minute Id be crying and asking myself what the hell we had gotten ourselves into.

The couple ended up buying four other apartments within the same building so they could take complete ownership, ultimately costing them a total of 40,000. They only have 60,000 for the rest of the project, 20,000 of which already went toward reconstructing the roof. With funds limited, their in-person and virtual community stepped in to help. People in the area donated extra material, Segeren says, and their Instagram fans, of which they have more than 150,000, donated more than 8,000 through GoFundMe.

Its such a great little niche in the Instagram world and in the online world, she says. You dont have to pose and make things up to please [the restoration] Instagram followers. People are just happy to see you as you, and your house as it is, and see the hard work that youre putting into it.

The homes stories and gritty details are part of the appeal, as opposed to other parts of Instagram that are highly curated and finished. This isnt about interior design but rather the journey and rough edges. One photo on their account shows Hunter in a raincoat and rain boots up to his knees in mud. Others detail water damage and steps to restore the homes stone walls.

Their followers, like many other restoration fans, have consistently ponied up for causes and homes they support.

Finkelstein sold pins, for example, to raise money for Nina Simones childhood home, through a campaign on the National Trust for Historic Preservations website. She raised $5,000 in donations within only a couple of days. The Berrys GoFundMe sits at over $33,000, most of which came after the house burned down, which theyll use to raze the property. Eventually, they hope to move another historic property, which would otherwise be destroyed, onto the lot. Their window restorer, Andrew Wing, lost his tools in the fire and raised nearly $7,000 to replace them.

I have enjoyed following you since the very beginning, one donator wrote on the Berrys fundraiser. I cant believe how sad I was and still am over a house Ive never been to and people I have never met. I think you two are amazing and you should be very proud of the community you have created in this virtual world.

Louises demise shook the community. It literally felt like a person had died, Finkelstein says. It was a moment where time just seemed to stop, Scott Reed, of @savingoldhouses, says about when he heard Louise was burning.

Louise stood for 170 years and lived a second life as an influencer on Instagram. Although a freak event took it down, the homes fans invigorate the Berrys to keep restoring.

I could very easily get to a point where Im like, I just cant do this again. Its too painful to lose, so why even try it again, Laine says. But because of these people, because of this amazing community, I feel a responsibility to continue the work that they have become so invested in.

They no longer have to imagine Louises future; they know what it is. Instead, they can picture a future for the lot in Louisville, Georgia, where Louise once stood and a new, old home will be soon. The community, as always, is imagining that, too.

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Tiny elephant shrew species documented in Horn of Africa for first time in nearly 50 years – SCNow

Posted: at 9:59 pm

"In the scientific community we try to use a reserved language that would classify the animals as 'charismatic microfauna,' which translates from science speak to normal speak as 'adorable little animals.'"

During a research trip to Djibouti in early 2019, a team including Heritage, Galen Rathbun from the California Academy of Sciences and Houssein Rayaleh from Association Djibouti Nature set out to see if they could find the tiny mammal.

The team set more than 1,200 live-traps using bait made from peanut butter, oatmeal and yeast -- a far cry from the sengi's normal diet of ants and termites, but Heritage explained why it's not such a strange choice.

"You can imagine if you're a small mouse-sized mammal in the super-arid desert rocky landscapes and you smell something one night that smells like Marmite and peanut butter, you're gonna go to check that out," he said.

In a paper published Tuesday in the journal Peer J, the team concluded that not only was the Somali sengi more common than thought, it lives over a larger area that covers Somalia and Djibouti, and potentially Ethiopia.

Heritage believes that the lack of urban development and widespread agriculture in the arid areas the Somali sengi calls home is good news for the animal.

Heritage plans to return to the Horn of Africa next year to place radio tags on some of the animals in order to work out more about where they live, how much space they use and how pairs are formed.

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COLUMN: News-Times ‘pours it on’ with Vernon Thompson eulogy – Carolinacoastonline

Posted: at 9:59 pm

Newspaper editorials are designed to inspire their readers to think. The Carteret County News-Times hit the bullseye with its July 19 editorial tribute to the late Vernon Thompson of Atlantic Beach. I didnt know Vernon, but I knew his type.

It was fun learning about Vernons contributions to the News-Times during his career, dating back more than 50 years to the days of hot type in the 1960s.

Vernon, who died at age 82, was part of a family known as the Retired Hot Metal Printers. Its motto is: We make type the old-fashioned way. We pour it.

The editorialist applauded Vernon as a venerable typographer, a truly skilled trades professional, someone who could operate, fix and basically cajole Linotype and Ludlow machines to cast the lead type for the papers...flatbed press.

Furthermore, Vernon was able to read a frame of lead type that was upside down and wrong-reading as fast as if he were reading the printed page.

This ability to essentially read upside down and backwards is not something they teach you in journalism school. You had to learn it as an apprentice in the backshop of a working newspaper.

The workhorse machine of the backshop, according to Bob Greene, former columnist with the Chicago Tribune, was the Linotype. They were amazing contraptions true miracles of engineering that were used to set type made from molten metal, he noted.

The Linotype was invented in 1886 in Baltimore by German immigrant Ottmar Mergenthaler. Thomas Edison called the machine the eighth wonder of the world, with its 18,000 moving parts.

Dan Piepenbring of The Paris Review newspaper, based in New York City, described the Linotype as the offspring of a gloriously complicated love affair between a Singer sewing machine, a loom and an oom-pah band.

Hot type created a unique team spirit, Greene said. Maxine E. Hensel of the Maryville (Ohio) Journal-Tribune, epitomized the bond that existed between writers and Linotype operators.

Hensel was one of those Linotype operators. She told Greene: When Id see something that didnt seem right, Id go talk to an editor or a reporter, just to check it out.

When the paper would come up, you would automatically look at the stories you helped set in type, Hensel said. You didnt write the stories, but they felt like they were yours anyway.

Jay Thorwaldson broke into the newspaper businesses as a reporter with the Palo Alto (Calif.) Times during the tail-end of the hot type era.

With the demise of hot type, old printers pranks died, too, Thorwaldson said. A wily compositor might complain to a cub reporter that he was having trouble with type lice. Those are little varmints that infest galleys of type that have been sitting around awhile, usually a few weeks, at least. Sort of like tiny termites that live in lead.

Look, he would say, pulling out a dusty old galley and spreading the slugs (individual lines of type) apart in a fan-shaped bend. No type lice. Well, sometimes you have to bring them to the surface, he would say, pouring some ink-solvent onto the type. This makes em come out for air.

As the unsuspecting rookie reporter would lean over and peer down between the separated slugs to get a closer look, the compositor would snap them closed, splashing solvent everywhere and scaring the devil out of the young man or woman. It was a rite of passage.

And now you know how ink gets into the blood of people who work in the newspaper industry.

May Vernon Thompson be smiling down upon us all.

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USC’s Antisemitism Problem and the Gross Negligence of Education – Algemeiner

Posted: at 9:55 pm

The University of Southern California campus. Photo: Padsquad19 via Wikimedia Commons.

The recent case of Jewish student Rose Ritchs resignation from the student government at the University of Southern California (USC) spotlights not only the ongoing problem of campus antisemitism, but more alarmingly, the failure of campus administrators to address the problem head-on.

Ritch, who endured continuous harassment and bullying by fellow USC students based on her religious and national identity, turned to various institutions on and off campus for guidance.

Ritch followed protocol, as outlined by the USC student handbook, when filing her complaints with the university; the same handbook outlines multiple student conduct offenses that Ritchs fellow peers committed.

But did the university reprimand the students for these violations? No. Did the university ensure Ritchs emotional and physical safety? No. And finally, is USC President Carol L. Folts recent letter a sufficient response? No.

August 19, 2020 5:39 am

It is this final no that requires the most attention. In her letter bemoaning the intense pressure and toxic conditions that led to her [Ritchs] decision [to resign], Folt assures her campus community, and those looking on from the outside, that USC will launch a new educational initiative to counter on-campus hate through the USC Shoah Foundations Stronger than Hate program. As per the programs own language, becoming stronger than hate means fostering a culture of antiracism. To be clear, Ms. Ritch is not a victim of racism. She is a victim of antisemitism.

Treating antisemitism with the elixir of anti-racism is not appropriate. While antisemitism, such as that expressed by the Nazi party, may take on racist features, antisemitism shares little with racism.

Racism is the idea that one race is superior to another. A major feature of racism is dehumanization. Racists often describe an unwanted race as impure; racists rely on propaganda that likens an inferior race to termites, rats, apes, and the like.

Termed the longest hatred, antisemitism can be dated as far back as the Jewish peoples status as slaves in Egypt or the birth of Christianity.

And antisemitism, unlike racism, does not view the Jews as inferior. Rather, sometimes it views Jews as being super-human. Accusations against Jews, such as world domination or killing Christ (deicide), contradict racist ideology.

If the goal is to confront and combat antisemitism, the first and most crucial step is to correctly identify it. If we cannot identify that which we encounter, no Stronger than Hate program will ever help prevent Jew-hatred. Hannah Arendt pointed out that antisemitism, unlike other forms of hatred, does not seek to colonize or enslave the Jewish people, instead antisemitisms end goal is genocide. Indeed, as history teaches us, wherever Jews lived as minorities, antisemitism culminated with, in the case of Imperial Russia pogroms, Nazi Germany the Holocaust, and Soviet Russia the imprisonment and deaths of Jews and Zionists.

USCs attempt to triage antisemitism through Stronger than Hate is, unfortunately, part of a pattern of ineffectual programming that does not combat antisemitism. Take, for example, the ADLs initiative Words to Action, a program that treats antisemitism as prejudice. Employing the pyramid of hate, ADL staff are helicoptered into schools to help students learn about antisemitism. Yet the pyramid does not address manifestations of antisemitism, but rather any form of hate or intolerance. Another initiative to help combat antisemitism is Holocaust education. But as recently described in professor Ruth Wisses The Dark Side of Holocaust Education, Holocaust education has, unfortunately, been detrimental to staving off antisemitism. For evidence that Holocaust education does little to decrease antisemitism, just look at the United Kingdom, whose high levels of antisemitism coincide with Holocaust fatigue at British schools.

This, then, is the gravest tragedy to have unfolded from Ritchs case: educators decided that their role was to be surgeons of the heart to fix through education the wrongs committed historically to all persecuted minorities. What they woefully overlooked was a crucial component of any true educational endeavor: the particular context that, in this case, foments hate. Until large institutions such as the ADL, the Shoah Foundation, and the Unites States Holocaust Memorial Museum, to name a few, actually teach about antisemitism, we will never truly confront this age-old disease.

Dr. Naya Lekht is the Director of Education at Club Z, a Zionist youth movement whose goal is to cultivate the next generation of proud and articulate Jews.

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Coast Radio Auction items – Coast Radio

Posted: at 9:55 pm

ITEM#

BUSINESS

VALUE

DESCRIPTION

1

$65.00

$150.00

3

$265.00

$100.00

$140.00

$300.00

$50.00

$100.00

$110.00

$320.00

$80.00

$120.00

$170.00

$185.00

$300.00

$130.00

17

$100.00

18

$200.00

19

$420.00

20

$50.00

21

$125.00

22

$250.00

23

$100.00

24

$140.00

25

$225.00

26

$100.00

27

$115.00

28

$125.00

29

$140.00

30

$195.00

31

$70.00

32

$200.00

33

$80.00

34

$450.00

35

$200.00

36

$400.00

37

$100.00

38

$100.00

39

$300.00

40

$120.00

41

$390.00

42

$120.00

43

$140.00

44

$180.00

45

$125.00

46

$192.00

47

$100.00

48

$219.00

49

$75.00

50

$250.00

51

$195.00

52

$200.00

53

$160.00

54

$200.00

55

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Termite-fishing chimpanzees provide clues to the evolution of technology – University of Miami

Posted: August 18, 2020 at 10:00 pm

Researchers, who remotely videotaped a generation of wild chimpanzees learning to use tools, gain insights into how technology came to define human culture.

Using the now-ubiquitous manmade technology of motion-activated cameras, researchers who remotely watched 25 immature chimpanzees grow up have documented how humankinds closest relatives living in the Congo Basin acquire their unique tool skills for harvesting termites, a favorite nutrient-rich element of the chimpanzee diet.

Unlike chimpanzees in East and West Africa, who use a single tool to extract termites, chimpanzees in Central Africas Congo Basin use tool setspuncturing sticks or perforating twigs plus fishing probesto harvest the insects from underground nests or towering earthen mounds scattered across lowland forests. Arguably, chimpanzees living in this region have the most sophisticated arsenal of tool-using skills documented in the animal kingdom. Not only do they use specialized tool sets to harvest termites, ants, and honey, but they customize the implements with different modifications to improve their efficiency.

Trying to untangle how chimpanzees in the Congo Basin acquire these complex tool tasks, University of Miami biological anthropologist Stephanie Musgrave screened thousands of hours of video that recorded visits to termite nests, including those by forest elephants, leopards, and gorillas, in the Republic of Congos Goualougo Triangle. Her reward was identifying more than 660 hours of periodic visits by 25 young chimpanzees belonging to a notoriously elusive subspecies of chimpanzee (Pantroglodytes troglodytes). Recorded over 15 years, this footage captured the development of their tool-using skills from birth until maturity.

Now, in the first study assessing when Central African chimpanzees learn to use and make their unique termite-extracting tool sets, Musgrave and fellow researchers with the Goualougo Triangle Ape Project provide novel insights into how chimpanzee cultures persist over generationsand perhaps how technology came to be a defining aspect of human evolution.

In the above video, an adult female chimpanzee and her two offspring fish for termites from an epigeal (above-ground) nest in the Goualougo Triangle, Republic of Congo.

Chimpanzees have the most complex tool behaviors of any animals outside of humans, so studying how their youngsters become proficient at these tasks can help us better understand how early humans might have acquired complex technological skills, said Musgrave, an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology and lead author of the study published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology.

Examining the development of these perishable tool kits is of particular interest because our ancestors likely also used perishable toolsmade of plants rather than stonebut these tools are not preserved in the archeological record, she added.

For their study, Musgrave and her co-authorsElizabeth Lonsdorf, David Morgan, and Crickette Sanzconducted the first, direct comparison of tool skill acquisition between two populations of chimpanzees, those at Goualougo and those more than 1,300 miles to the east, in Gombe, Tanzania.

In the video above, a juvenile female chimpanzee and her mother use brush-tipped fishing probes to extract termites from a subterranean nest in the Goualougo Triangle, Republic of Congo.

Lonsdorf, a professor of psychology at Franklin & Marshall College, studies chimpanzees at Gombe, the oldest field study of wild chimpanzees established by renowned primatologist Jane Goodall 60 years ago. Morgan, of Chicagos Lincoln Park Zoo, and Sanz, of Washington University in St. Louis, co-founded the Goualougo Triangle Ape Projectthe longest-running behavioral study of wild Central African chimpanzeesand, in partnership with the Wildlife Conservation Society, have studied this population for more than 20 years. They also pioneered the use of remote video technology to study wild chimpanzee behavior.

For their current study, the research team adapted the methods developed at Gombe for studying the acquisition of tool skills. And, they found notable differences in the timing and sequence in which the chimpanzees in these two populations acquired their termite-gathering skillsdifferences that could relate to the challenges of using and making multiple tools at Goualougo.

While infants at both Goualougo and Gombe begin trying to use tools within their first two years, the Gombe youngsters learn to make their tools before or at the same time they become proficient at using them. In contrast, the Goualougo youngsters learn to termite fish before acquiring their tool-making skills. In early life, they typically use tools that have been discarded or transferred to them by other, older chimpanzees.

Unlike the Gombe chimpanzees, who use varied materials, the Goualougo chimpanzees also carefully select the materials for their tools, almost always from just a few species of plants. And they modify them to improve their efficiency.

They have a mental template of the right tool for the job, and theres no mistaking the different tool types, Musgrave said. Puncturing tools are made from a species of tree thats very durable and resistant, while fishing probes are made from smooth, pliable stems of vegetation. In contrast to Gombe, the chimpanzees at Goualougo fray these probes with their teeth to manufacture a paint-brush-like tip, which makes the tool 10 times more efficient at capturing termites.

After learning to make their own tools, Musgrave discovered, the Goualougo chimpanzees begin to employ them sequentiallyusing a perforating twig plus a fishing probe to harvest the termites that inhabit the above-ground nests and a puncturing stick plus a fishing probe to extract them from the much-harder-to-pierce underground nests. The latter task is so arduous that the researchers predicted it would be the last mastered and just by a few chimpanzees. They were right.

Ive observed chimpanzees make hundreds of attempts to puncture into a subterranean termite nest, Musgrave said. Not only does the skill require immense strength but also technical competencies that may continue to develop in adolescence.

The findings underscore how the developmental trajectory of life skills can vary considerably depending on the task and across chimpanzee populations, which have unique local cultures. In the study, the researchers note that the variation in tool traditions between sites could be linked to differences in the role of social input from other chimpanzees.

In previous research, we documented that mother chimpanzees at Goualougo play a more active and helpful role when compared to mothers at Gombe, Musgrave said. At Goualougo, mothers are more likely to transfer tools to their offspring. This enhanced assistance could be instrumental in the acquisition of skills over the longer time period.

Figuring out how tool traditions are passed on and how this differs within and between species, Musgrave said, could help humans understand the emergence of cumulative culture during our own evolution.

One of the key features of human culture is its remarkable complexity, she said. ideas and innovations accumulate over time, such that new generations inherit and learn to use technologies that are far more complex than any one individual could invent. Comparative studies give us insights into how technology came to be a defining aspect of human evolution.

But, as Musgrave cautioned, the continuation and expansion of such research depends on the long-term preservation of wild chimpanzees and their cultureswhich are increasingly endangered by human activities.

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Tiny elephant shrew species documented in Horn of Africa for first time in nearly 50 years – Martinsville Bulletin

Posted: at 10:00 pm

The mammals also form monogamous mating pairs for life, and live in a fairly small home range that's exclusive from other pairs, added Heritage.

"It's really a fascinating combination of mammal traits that aren't really found in any other order of mammals," he said.

"In the scientific community we try to use a reserved language that would classify the animals as 'charismatic microfauna,' which translates from science speak to normal speak as 'adorable little animals.'"

During a research trip to Djibouti in early 2019, a team including Heritage, Galen Rathbun from the California Academy of Sciences and Houssein Rayaleh from Association Djibouti Nature set out to see if they could find the tiny mammal.

The team set more than 1,200 live-traps using bait made from peanut butter, oatmeal and yeast -- a far cry from the sengi's normal diet of ants and termites, but Heritage explained why it's not such a strange choice.

"You can imagine if you're a small mouse-sized mammal in the super-arid desert rocky landscapes and you smell something one night that smells like Marmite and peanut butter, you're gonna go to check that out," he said.

In a paper published Tuesday in the journal Peer J, the team concluded that not only was the Somali sengi more common than thought, it lives over a larger area that covers Somalia and Djibouti, and potentially Ethiopia.

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How to Get Rid of Flying Ants in Your Home, According to Pest Experts – Prevention.com

Posted: at 10:00 pm

From fruit flies to house flies to fungus gnats, spotting any kind of bug that can buzz about your home is a total pain. But many people dont realize that one of the most annoying pests to eradicateantscan also fly until they see them hovering around indoors.

And nope, theyre not some odd breed. There are several species of ants that have flying ants in their colonies, such as carpenter ants, fire ants, and pharaoh ants, says Desiree Straubinger, board certified entomologist and market technical director of Western Exterminator.

Flying ants, known as alates, are sexually mature ants, according to Howard Russell, M.S., an entomologist at Michigan State University. Theyre known as the reproductives of the colony, which were created by the queen and fed by worker ants. Flying ants typically come together to mate on clear days after rainy weatheremergences known as nuptial flights, which occur around summer into early autumn.

Afterward, males and females come back to the ground and males are done, says entomologist Roberto M. Pereira, Ph.D., an insect research scientist with the University of Florida. Normally [males] will die or may be eaten by other insects or birds. The females will lose their wings and look for a good spot to start a new colony.

Compared to your typical worker ants (the ones you see out and about on the ground), flying ants tend to be bigger in size and obviously have wings, Russell says. Most worker ants are female, but flying ants also include males. They can range in color, from black to brown to red.

Many people confuse flying ants with termites, Straubinger says. But termites are generally smaller than ants and their wings are the same length or longer than their bodies.

For the most part, flying ants are focused on mating and dont really care about you. But they do have mandibles (mouth parts) and can technically use them to bite, Russell says.

Depending on the type of ant thats near you, they can also sting you, Pereira says. In Florida and other warmer climates, an ant called hypoponera punctatissima (a small, yellow-brown species) will sting people. Other ants may do that occasionally, too, he says.

One simple of way of determining if a flying ant could potentially harm you: If a species of ant doesnt bite or sting, the alates of that species wont bite or sting either, says Frank Meek, technical services manager at Rollins. If the ant species bites or stings, the alates of that species can still bite or sting if they feel threatened.

If you spot flying ants inside your home, dont panic. While the female could technically start a nest inside your place, Pereira says its pretty unlikely. Air conditioning and heating can cause ants to dry up and die very rapidly inside houses, he says.

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While flying ants should settle down pretty quickly (and the males will die), you can kill them off one by one if they bother you, Pereira says. Traditional ant bait is unlikely to lure them in, so use a swatter, rolled up magazine, or even a vacuum to suck them up.

If you cant seem to catch them, another easy hack is trying to trap them in sticky tape or fly paper. Simply hang up the paper or ribbon, which is designed to attract and catch flying insects, near any areas youve noticed the flying ants hanging out. (If you suspect you have a full on ant problem and the colony is nearby, check out these tips on how to get rid of ants in general.)

You can also keep antswinged or otherwisefrom entering your home by sealing up holes and entry points, Straubinger says. This includes any cracks or crevices in the wall or floor, and openings around windows, screens, vents, or doors.

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Termite Control Market Size and Growth By Leading Vendors, By Types and Application, By End Users and Forecast to 2027 – Bulletin Line

Posted: at 10:00 pm

New Jersey, United States,- This detailed market research covers the growth potential of the Termite Control Market, which can help stakeholders understand the key trends and prospects of the Termite Control market and identify growth opportunities and competitive scenarios. The report also focuses on data from other primary and secondary sources and is analyzed using a variety of tools. This will help investors better understand the growth potential of the market and help investors identify scope and opportunities. This analysis also provides details for each segment of the global Termite Control market.

The report was touted as the most recent event hitting the market due to the COVID-19 outbreak. This outbreak brought about a dynamic change in the industry and the overall economic scenario. This report covers the analysis of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on market growth and revenue. The report also provides an in-depth analysis of the current and future impacts of the pandemic and post-COVID-19 scenario analysis.

The report covers extensive analysis of the key market players in the market, along with their business overview, expansion plans, and strategies. The key players studied in the report include:

The market is further segmented on the basis of types and end-user applications. The report also provides an estimation of the segment expected to lead the market in the forecast years. Detailed segmentation of the market based on types and applications along with historical data and forecast estimation is offered in the report.

Furthermore, the report provides an extensive analysis of the regional segmentation of the market. The regional analysis covers product development, sales, consumption trends, regional market share, and size in each region. The market analysis segment covers forecast estimation of the market share and size in the key geographical regions.

The report further studies the segmentation of the market based on product types offered in the market and their end-use/applications.

By Species Type:

Dampwood Termites Subterranean Termites Drywood Termites Others

By Control Method:

Chemical Synthetic Pyrethroids Phenylprazole Chlorinated Hydrocarbons Chloronicotinyl Organophosphates Others Physical and Mechanical Termite Barriers Bait Technology Pitfall Biological Microbials Botanicals Nematode Control Others

By Application:

Residential Commercial and Industrial Livestock and Agriculture Farms Others

On the basis of regional segmentation, the market is bifurcated into major regions ofNorth America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and the Middle East & Africa.The regional analysis further covers country-wise bifurcation of the market and key players.

The research report offered by Verified Market Research provides an updated insight into the global Termite Control market. The report covers an in-depth analysis of the key trends and emerging drivers of the market likely to influence industry growth. Additionally, the report covers market characteristics, competitive landscape, market size and growth, regional breakdown, and strategies for this market.

Highlights of the TOC of the Termite Control Report:

Overview of the Global Termite Control Market

Market competition by Players and Manufacturers

Competitive landscape

Production, revenue estimation by types and applications

Regional analysis

Industry chain analysis

Global Termite Control market forecast estimation

This Termite Control report umbrellas vital elements such as market trends, share, size, and aspects that facilitate the growth of the companies operating in the market to help readers implement profitable strategies to boost the growth of their business. This report also analyses the expansion, market size, key segments, market share, application, key drivers, and restraints.

Key Questions Addressed in the Report:

What are the key driving and restraining factors of the global Termite Control market?

What is the concentration of the market, and is it fragmented or highly concentrated?

What are the major challenges and risks the companies will have to face in the market?

Which segment and region are expected to dominate the market in the forecast period?

What are the latest and emerging trends of the Termite Control market?

What is the expected growth rate of the Termite Control market in the forecast period?

What are the strategic business plans and steps were taken by key competitors?

Which product type or application segment is expected to grow at a significant rate during the forecast period?

What are the factors restraining the growth of the Termite Control market?

Thank you for reading our report. The report is available for customization based on chapters or regions. Please get in touch with us to know more about customization options, and our team will ensure you get the report tailored according to your requirements.

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Termite Control Market Size and Growth By Leading Vendors, By Types and Application, By End Users and Forecast to 2027 - Bulletin Line

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