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‘Why Let a Good Crisis Go to Waste?’: What India Needs to Remember to Overcome its Economic Slump – The Wire

Posted: November 21, 2019 at 7:46 pm

There is a near-consensus among economists that the Indian economy has hit a rough patch recently. The economy grew at just 5% per annum in the first quarter (April-June) of FY 2019-20, a sharp drop from about 8% per annum during the same period, two years ago.

The question is, how did we get here and why could reviving the economy be a protracted affair? The answers are brought into sharper focus when viewed through the lens of governance.

Indias state of governance

The governance of a country is a set of formal and informal rules and regulations through which governments come to power and conduct themselves, public institutions implement their mandates, media report developments and represent views, and the rule of law is upheld in a timely, transparent, and fair manner to ensure human rights, peace and security.

Countries and their governance shall ideally co-exist in perpetuity, unlike the passage of parties and personalities.

Naturally, we cannot expect exactitude in assessing governance. However, a number of indicators capture its essential aspects. For instance, the World Bank compiles a set of six Worldwide Governance Indicators (WGIs) based on surveys of a large number of enterprises and citizens in over 200 countries. While these indicators do not represent the official views of the institution and are not used to make lending decisions, they are among the Banks widely-cited and better-known research projects.

The WGIs allow an assessment of the overall state of governance of a country relative to those prevailing in other countries. The six indicators are political stability and absence of violence, regulatory quality, control of corruption, rule of law, government effectiveness, and voice and accountability. Scores are expressed in terms of percentiles. For instance, Indias political stability and absence of violence scores a percentile average of 14.11 for the period of 1996-2017. This means 85.89% of countries in the world scored better than India in this aspect of governance.

In order for the general public to easily interpret the scores, I assign grades as follows: an A grade for percentile scores between 90-100; B for scores between 70-89; C for scores between 60-69; D for scores between 51-59; and an F (for fail) grade for percentile scores between 0-50.

Based on average percentile ranks of the WGIs for 1996-2017, the longest period for which they were available when my book went to press, India scores an F in the first three aspects of governance, a D grade in the next two, and a C in the last.

A student with these grades would have surely failed in class! Therefore, it is not surprising that such poor governance has imposed a huge cost on the country.

Representative image. Photo: Reuters

Roots of the slowdown

The main drivers of Indias economic growth are exports, consumption, investment, and government expenditures. The following explains how poor governance has choked all these drivers.

Considering that India has the fifth largest economy and the second largest population in the world, its exports of goods and services account for a piddling 1.6% of global exports. The mediocre export performance is plainly visible here in the United States we can hardly find any Indian manufactured goods in American shopping malls. This anecdotal impression confirms a factIndian industry still cannot compete with major exporters. In short, we cannot expect exports to revive economic growth.

Certain economic and social policies can have adverse consequences far into the future which can take a long time to reverse. For example, China is still paying the price today for its one-child policy which it implemented in 1979 and eliminated at the end of 2015. While hindsight is always 20/20, the fact remains that the damage done to Indias private sector due to a controlled economy based on heavy state intervention continues to hamper Indian industries more than 70 years after Independence.

The roots of Indias employment problem lie in the weaknesses of the private sector which has been unable to take advantage of the latest technologies and expand the range of production.

Also read:The Dangers of Dismantling Indias Public Sector

This brings us to private consumption which accounts for about two-thirds of Indias GDP and is therefore a major driver of growth. How is poor governance responsible for falling consumption?

An IMF study found that countries that are weakly governed tend to invest far less in health and education, compared to strongly governed ones. True enough, successive governments in India have, since Independence, invested little towards developing human capital.

For instance, India has one of the worlds lowest educational spending to GDP ratios. Moreover, Indias quality of public healthcare is abysmal. Instead, government spending priorities favoured projects that improved the short-term electoral prospects of politicians rather than the long-term development of human capital.

Consequently, when growth took off after 1991, the poorly educated and unhealthy workers could not take advantage of expanding opportunities. Instead, the benefits of growth accrued mainly to the upper income groups while a major portion of Indias workforce had to turn to the informal labor markets to find employment. Today, more than 90% of the countrys workforce is employed in the informal sector where wages are low and benefits are scarce.

Thus, the incomes of the vast majority of workers increased at a snails pace in inflation-adjusted terms thereby saddling the country with one of the worlds highest income disparities.

While growth led to a rise in the consumption of upper income groups, the increase could not offset the fall in consumption of the vast majority of Indias low-income households. Given the collapse in consumption, the majority of firms which produce mostly for the low- and middle-income households see no reason to expand production. A corporate tax cut is not going to stimulate investment if demand continues to be sluggish.

Growth of the informal sector

Hamstrung by labor and other regulations as well as issues of competitiveness, the Indian private sector has been unable to generate enough jobs in the organised sector. A large informal sector is also responsible for a narrow tax base.

With about 3% of Indias workforce paying income taxes, tax-based redistributive policies can only mitigate income inequality at a glacial pace.

Also read:Indias Telecom Industry Is Being Cracked Like a Nut, but What Should the Centre Do?

Abhijit Banerjee, the 2019 Nobel laureate in economics, recommends a targeted basic income (TBI) from the central government to poor (mostly rural) households in order to boost consumption spending which is the main driver of Indias economic growth. He does not think that the government should concern itself too much with fiscal restraint at the present time when the immediate objective is to forestall an economic crisis. However, Banerjee expects that the consolidation of existing subsidies into a single TBI will take time to implement.

Looking through the lens of governance reveals other reasons why it may take a long time to revive the economy.

The degradation of policy instruments

I see the protracted nature of the slowdown as having more to do with the degradation of policy instruments than the deficiencies of economic theory and policy. The reasoning goes well beyond the complexities of having to design and implement a TBI for poor households.

The proposed TBI belongs to a subset of fiscal policy instruments. However, fiscal termites bred by widespread corruption, weak regulatory institutions, poor data, lack of law and order, ineffective government, and other weaknesses in governance have reduced tax collection and shrunk the fiscal space.

Thus, weaknesses in governance have all but ensured that the governments implementation of the TBI may take a long time.

While on the one hand the fiscal space is limited, on the other, the TBI cannot be income-neutral in order to boost consumption. In other words, the TBI received by eligible households must be significantly larger than the various subsidies it will replace.

However, there is hardly any fiscal space left to undertake a consumption-boosting TBI on a long-term basis. Fiscal space is simply the capacity to undertake additional expenditures given the present fiscal conditions. If, for example, the central and state governments are already running large deficits, how much more can it spend on projects like the TBI on a sustainable basis?

By sustainable, I mean if a consumption-stimulating TBI leads to larger deficits, can those deficits be financed without causing high inflation and increasing interest rates?

The corrosion of fiscal policy instruments such as the TBI is a direct consequence of Indias poor state of governance.

A vendor puts onions in a sack after sorting them at a vegetable market in Mumbai. Photo: Reuters/Danish Siddiqui

The other impediment to a quick deployment of the TBI is poor data quality, which is often the case in weakly governed countries. In other words, a reliable database on incomes, number of family members, and other pertinent information on rural households is necessary in order to determine whether they are eligible to receive the TBI. The government would find it difficult to implement the TBI in a timely manner if the relevant information on rural households are not available or are of poor quality.

Fraudulent invoicing of trade is one fiscal termite which eats into tax collection and shrinks the fiscal space. Studies at Global Financial Integrity show that the government is losing significant amount of tax revenues through deliberate trade mis-invoicing.

While the undervaluation of imports leads to a loss of customs duties and GST on imports, export under-invoicing enables companies to shift profits abroad resulting in a loss of corporate taxes.

Also read:Public Sector Banks Report Fraud of More Than Rs 958 Billion in 6 Months

For example, companies run by Nirav Modi overvalued diamond imports to obtain massive loans from public sector banks (PSBs) over many years. These loans were then siphoned off to tax havens while the banks were left holding the bag. Such scams show that the fraudulent invoicing of exports and imports is very much alive and kicking in India.

Weak governance has also degraded monetary policy. The scams perpetuated by politically connected persons were financed by PSBs which were saddled with massive non-performing loans.

Under the circumstances, a cut in interest rates would not stimulate consumption and investment demand because the banks cannot lend as much given the precarious state of their balance sheets. Moreover, the need to capitalise these banks would impose a heavy burden on taxpayers and further shrink the fiscal space. Selective credit policies to boost lending to say the agriculture sector would also be hamstrung by PSBs unwilling to make new loans. Thus, the traditional instruments of monetary policy have also been largely compromised through corruption and poor governance.

It is not that economists know little about how to revive a stalled economy. They have the policy instruments and have used them before to do their jobs.

The problem is that Indias poor governance has seriously corroded the policy instruments needed to stimulate economic growth. Even as the government charts a path forward to revive the economy, it must develop a far-reaching plan to reform governance.

As someone once said, why let a good crisis go to waste?

Dev Kar is chief economist emeritus at Global Financial Integrity. He was previously senior economist at the International Monetary Fund.His book, India: Still A Shackled Giant, was recently released by Penguin Random House India.

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Violence against Jews is reprehensible. But isolated attacks distract us from the bigger threats. – JTA News

Posted: at 7:43 pm

NEW YORK (JTA) Although it hasnt yet been determined whether the brutal stabbing of a young father on his way to morning prayers in Ramapo, New York, was a an anti-Jewish hate crime, it was described by the local police chief as a vicious, violent attack and would certainly fit the ugly pattern of violence against identifiably Jewish Jews over recent months.

Like the 64-year-old rabbi who was hit in the head with a brick while on his daily morning walk in Crown Heights. He was hospitalized with a broken nose, missing teeth, stitches on his head and lacerations on his body.

In another case, a pair of men knocked down a Hasidic man walking peacefully along another Crown Heights street and, along with a third assailant, punched the stunned victim mercilessly.

In Borough Park, surveillance video shows a young man on a bicycle riding up from behind and knocking off the victims traditional fur hat.

In another recorded attack, a Jewish boy of 12 or 13 is surrounded and taunted by much older teens. Incredibly, as they menace their target, the boy just continues walking at the same measured pace. One of the group members violently swings at the boys hat, which flies off.

Another man is shown throwing a brick through the window of a Hasidic girls school in Crown Heights. That same night in Borough Park, at least three identifiably Orthodox men were punched repeatedly by assailants.

A woman and her children were attacked on Rosh Hashanah; the assailant ripped off her wig. Many other attacks were endured where no camera caught them.

To watch the surveillance videos that exist is to be painfully transported to another place and time. But the place on the screen isnt a Polish town and the time isnt the 1930s. The place is usually Brooklyn and the time is now.

What strikes a viewer of the videos is the sheer ferociousness of the attackers. Their victims dont provoke them in any way, but they attack with sheer brutality, striking out with maximum force and gusto.

Some, understandably, see in such crimes the most serious example of raw anti-Semitism in our days.

Anti-Semitic crimes have undergone a dramatic increase in the five boroughs this year, with 163 incidents reported though September, compared to 108 last year during the same time period, according to the New York City Police Department. Anti-Semitic incidents comprise 52 percent of reported hate crimes in New York City.

There is no doubt that many of the crimes are vicious, and no doubt that law enforcement authorities need to give greater protection to residents of Jewish neighborhoods. Increased real-time surveillance and undercover operations are undeniably in order.

But the ugliness of the attacks should not distract us Jews from a greater threat to our well-being and lives.

Because the hoodlums attacking innocent Jews in Brooklyn neighborhoods are, all said, just that: hoodlums.

They arent organized in any way, at least not beyond emulating one another for bragging rights. They are just punks and cowards. What great courage it takes to attack an unarmed and unsuspecting person from behind.

To be sure, no effort should be spared to catch and punish them.

Or to educate them. The ADL is spending $250,000 on No Place for Hate in Brooklyn, which will allow the program to be implemented in up to 40 schools across the borough this academic year, up from 22 at present.

Such efforts are worthwhile, although one wonders whether the sort of young people committing violent crimes are terribly attentive students.

Laudable human energy has been invested, too, in fostering good will among different communities living side by side in Brooklyn neighborhoods.

But the greater threat to Jews and not just Orthodox ones is less visible and thus even more dangerous than street brutes. It is organized, ideology-driven Jew-hatred.

Anti-Semitic ideologies come in a variety of noxious flavors. There is radical Islamist animus and the loathsome demagoguery of Louis Farrakhan, who compares Jews to termites. But when it comes to bombing or shooting up shuls or Jewish community centers, the predominant poison, it cant be denied, is white supremacy.

It is well documented how white supremacists use the web to bond, share advice and make plans. Using the web and social media, neo-Nazis promote wild conspiracy theories about Jews. One white power podcast, Strike and Mike, recently exposed the Impossible Burger, a meatless patty, as a Jewish plot to poison goys and, somehow, to make it impossible for working people to be able to afford meat, make it impossible for working people to drive automobiles, make it impossible for average people to live in an industrial society. It would be hilarious were it not that such fantasies are swallowed whole by intellect-challenged haters.

All anti-Semitism is mindless and evil. And all of it needs to be confronted and countered in every possible way. But we must not allow images of muggings, no matter how horrific and heart-wrenching, to obscure the more malignant machinations humming away day and night, largely undetectable, across cyberspace.

In the end, while no effort should be spared in fostering good relations among neighbors and in fighting hardened haters, we Jews do well to beseech the Creator to protect us from all evil.

RELATED:

Jewish man repeatedly stabbed outside New York synagogue

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of JTA or its parent company, 70 Faces Media.

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The global pest control services market is likely to grow at a CAGR of over 4% during the period 2019-2025 – PRNewswire

Posted: at 7:43 pm

NEW YORK, Nov. 18, 2019 /PRNewswire/ --

The global pest control services market is likely to grow at a CAGR of over 4% during the period 20192025.

Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05827566/?utm_source=PRN

The global pest control services market is witnessing a flurry of mergers and acquisition activities. The market is currently in the customer acquisition mode, and vendors are experimenting with value-added services and bundled offerings to gain customers' attention. There exists no uniformity on the global scale with respect to demand, labor cost, and application methods. They largely depend on the customer buying power and the economic condition of the country. Pest control services market is a labor-intensive industry, and growing economic activities reinforce its growth. The industry is highly competitive, as a large number of vendors characterizes it. For instance, in India, nearly 40% of the market is unorganized. The number of vendors in the organized sector has also increased, thereby affecting the industry in a multi-faceted manner.

The following factors are likely to contribute to the growth of the global pest control services market during the forecast period: Increase in Vector-borne Diseases Increased Pesticide Resistance Pest Insurance Coverage Growth in Mergers and Acquisitions Activities

The study considers the present scenario of the global pest control services market and its market dynamics for the period 2020?2025. The report covers a detailed overview of several market growth enablers, restraints, and trends. It covers both the demand and supply aspect of the market. It profiles and examines leading and prominent companies operating in the market.

Pest Control Services Market: Segmentation

This market research report includes detailed segmentation by product types, applications, control types, and geography. The demand for general pest control services is higher in several geographies than termite control services. Japan, Europe, and North America are the major countries where termite treatment services are mainly high because the application of wood in these regions is high both in residential and commercial sectors. Factors such as the growth of viral diseases, improvement in living standards, and the growth of the population are driving the segment. The rise in the housing market in the developed countries is bolstering the termite treatment business. The regulatory push in the pre-construction industry is further supporting the growth of termite control services.

While the demand for non-chemical alternatives is increasing, especially from developed regions, developing countries are heavily dependent on chemical methods. Mechanical methods are limited to a certain type of bugs and have been losing share to chemical methods. The ease of availability and cost-effectiveness of chemical solutions are the major reasons for their high adoption. On the other hand, the lack of complexity in regulations with respect to the usage of mechanical or physical devices is preferred by service providers. APAC and Latin America are the major end-users of mechanical methods.

The demand for residential pest control services is higher in Europe and North America than in APAC and Latin America. Globally, the demand is growing as climatic conditions vary across the region, and the requirement in each of the regions varies accordingly. However, the demand for mosquito eradication, termite extermination, and rodent control solutions is high in the residential sector.

Market Segmentation by Pest Type General Pest Control Termite ControlMarket Segmentation by Type Chemical Mechanical Other Pest Control MethodsMarket Segmentation by Application Residential Commercial Industrial Others

Geographical Segmentation

The demand in North America is promising across application categories with end-user sectors preferring professionals than using DIY products. The high usage of wood in buildings, both residential and commercial sectors, provides significant opportunities for service providers. The region is expected to lead the global market during the forecast period, as the pest-free environment is accorded high priorities across application segments.

The growth of construction activities and the high prevalence of vector-borne diseases are major factors contributing to the growth in APAC. Moreover, the rise in the construction of commercial spaces - hospitality, airports, and industrial clusters - has tremendously contributed to the growth of the APAC pest control market.

Market Segmentation by Geography North Americao USo Canada Europeo Italyo Germanyo Franceo UKo Spain APACo Chinao Japano Australiao South Koreao Malaysia Latin Americao Brazilo Mexicoo Argentinao Chile MEAo Turkeyo South Africao Egypto Saudi Arabiao UAE

Key Vendor AnalysisThe competition is intense, with several global, regional, and local players. The market is fragmented with only a few players occupying major shares. Vendors are implementing innovative products and services such as digital services and focusing on developing service portfolios to gain a higher share. The focus is shifting toward the digitization of pest control services or developing mobile supporting applications to enhance the customer's experience.

Key Vendors Anticimex Ecolab Rentokil Initial Rollins Terminix Truly Nolen Massey Services Inc.

Other Prominent Vendors Dodson Pest Control Lindsey Pest Services Cook's Pest Control Clark Pest Control Florida Pest Control Arrow Exterminators Hulett Environmental Services Rose Pest Solutions JG Pest Control Cleankill Pest Control Eastern Termite & Pest Control

Key Market InsightsThe analysis of the pest control market provides sizing and growth opportunities for the forecast period 20202025. Offers market sizing and growth prospects of the market for the forecast period 20202025 Provides comprehensive insights on the latest industry trends, forecast, and growth drivers in the market Includes a detailed analysis of growth drivers, challenges, and investment opportunities Delivers a complete overview of segments and the regional outlook of the market Offers an exhaustive summary of the vendor landscape, competitive analysis, and key strategies to gain competitive advantage

Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05827566/?utm_source=PRN

About Reportlinker ReportLinker is an award-winning market research solution. Reportlinker finds and organizes the latest industry data so you get all the market research you need - instantly, in one place.

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Should Investors Avoid Rollins (NYSE:ROL) Shares? BidaskScore Has Just Downgraded Them – The Lamp News

Posted: November 20, 2019 at 7:46 pm

Investors sentiment decreased to 0.9 in Q2 2019. Its down 0.33, from 1.23 in 2019Q1. It turned negative, as 35 investors sold Rollins, Inc. shares while 112 reduced holdings. 33 funds opened positions while 99 raised stakes. 133.32 million shares or 4.62% more from 127.43 million shares in 2019Q1 were reported.

Kepos Cap L P accumulated 0.08% or 21,095 shares. Horizon Investments Ltd Co holds 0.01% or 8,517 shares in its portfolio. Ls Investment Advisors reported 9,202 shares stake. Intrust State Bank Na reported 10,412 shares or 0.09% of all its holdings. Westpac Corporation owns 9,799 shares or 0% of their US portfolio. Janney Montgomery Scott Ltd Company owns 26,081 shares or 0.01% of their US portfolio. Gamco Et Al has 0.71% invested in Rollins, Inc. (NYSE:ROL). Hengehold Management Ltd Limited Liability Company holds 6,512 shares. Rampart Invest Co Limited Liability Co owns 13,982 shares. Tower Research Cap Llc (Trc) accumulated 0% or 168 shares. Wells Fargo And Commerce Mn reported 0% stake. S&Co holds 0.45% of its portfolio in Rollins, Inc. (NYSE:ROL) for 114,545 shares. 12,650 are owned by Riverhead Management Limited Liability Co. Banque Pictet And Cie accumulated 0.23% or 347,600 shares. Moreover, Utah Retirement has 0.02% invested in Rollins, Inc. (NYSE:ROL) for 26,912 shares.

In a report revealed this morning, BidaskScore downgraded their rating on shares of Rollins (NYSE:ROL) to a Buy.

The stock increased 0.36% or $0.13 during the last trading session, reaching $36.75. About 135,861 shares traded. Rollins, Inc. (NYSE:ROL) has declined 7.51% since November 20, 2018 and is downtrending. It has underperformed by 7.51% the S&P500.

Analysts await Rollins, Inc. (NYSE:ROL) to report earnings on January, 22. They expect $0.17 EPS, up 6.25 % or $0.01 from last years $0.16 per share. ROLs profit will be $55.66 million for 54.04 P/E if the $0.17 EPS becomes a reality. After $0.22 actual EPS reported by Rollins, Inc. for the previous quarter, Wall Street now forecasts -22.73 % negative EPS growth.

Rollins, Inc., through its subsidiaries, provides pest and termite control services to residential and commercial customers. The company has market cap of $12.03 billion. The Companys pest control services include protection against termite damage, rodents, and insects to homes and businesses, including hotels, food service establishments, food manufacturers, retailers, and transportation companies. It has a 59.08 P/E ratio. The firm also provides pest management and sanitation services and products to the food and commodity industries; consulting services on border protection related to Australia's biosecurity program; and bird control and specialist services, as well as offers specialized services to mining, and gas and oil sectors.

More notable recent Rollins, Inc. (NYSE:ROL) news were published by: Fool.com which released: Why Rollins Stock Climbed 11.9% in October Motley Fool on November 06, 2019, also Investorplace.com with their article: 10 Stocks to Buy Regardless of Q3 Earnings Investorplace.com published on October 28, 2019, Finance.Yahoo.com published: Is Rollins, Inc.s (NYSE:ROL) 25% ROE Better Than Average? Yahoo Finance on November 14, 2019. More interesting news about Rollins, Inc. (NYSE:ROL) were released by: Streetinsider.com and their article: Stifel Upgrades Rollins (ROL) to Hold StreetInsider.com published on November 06, 2019 as well as Fool.coms news article titled: Rollins Inc (ROL) Q3 2019 Earnings Call Transcript Motley Fool with publication date: October 23, 2019.

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Should Investors Avoid Rollins (NYSE:ROL) Shares? BidaskScore Has Just Downgraded Them - The Lamp News

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How the BHU students were demonised and the ones who refused to be secularised unfairly called bigots – OpIndia

Posted: at 7:45 pm

For a warrior, nothing is higher than a war against evil. The warrior confronted with such a war should be pleased, Arjuna, for it comes as an open gate to heaven. But if you do not participate in this battle against evil, you will incur sin, violating your dharma and your honour Swami Vivekananda

Dharma, which is at the soul of the Sanatan, is perhaps the most complex and liberating concept of Hinduism. Dharma has no equivalent term in any other language. Religion and Theology, the modern terms used are mostly anglicised, biblical and Abrahamic. It is a fact that Dharma has been used in different religious texts of Hinduism in different forms. And it is in this fact, that the BHU controversy is rooted.

BHU students have been protesting against the appointment of a Muslim professor in the Dharma Vigyan department. The students say, that in their course, they study mantra, shloka, yagna, vaidik rituals, Purohit Karm, recitation, Bhagwat recitation, jyotish, karmakand, etc. They are not only involved in studies but it is also the source of their livelihood. most of them spend their lives performing Purohit Karm. Essentially, the Dharma Vigyan department of BHU educates the future gatekeepers of Sanatan. The BHU students have repeatedly said that they are not against Muslims. They are not even against the Muslim professor teaching Sanskrit, however, they dont want a non-Hindu, teaching them about their religion.

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Read: Not against Muslims protesting students at BHU explain their position. An OpIndia exclusive

The facts of the case have been twisted beyond measure. One needs to understand at the very onset of this discussion that the students of Dharma Vigyan dont learn Sanskrit as a linguistic endeavour.

The first fact to understand is that BHU has a separate Arts department that teaches Sanskrit as a linguistic endeavour. Just as one would perhaps learn French or English or even Hindi.

The Sanskrit being taught at the Dharma Vigyan department has deep religious significance. For this, I quote Professor Feroze Khan himself:

Excerpt of Indian Express article

He says that in the Sanskrit department of Dharma Vigyan, one has to not only learn the technicalities of Sanskrit as a language but also famous dramas like Abhigyan Shakuntalam, Uttar Ramcharitam or Mahakavya like Raghuvansh Mahakavya or Harshcharitam. He further says that these have nothing to do with religion.

With all due respect to Professor Khan, this statement itself shows that Professor Khan is looking at Sanatan with Abrahamic lenses. For Islam or Christianity, their religious text, so to speak, is limited to the Quran or the Bible. That is the final word of God for co-religionists. In Sanatan, however, there is no final word of God and no codified text that defines Hinduism.

Follow is what Professor Khan calls dramas that have nothing to do with religion:

Uttar Ramcharitam: The Uttararamacarita is a Sanskrit play in 7 acts in the Nataka style by Bhavabhuti. It covers the events of the Uttara Kanda of the Valmiki Ramayana, the final years of Rama on Earth up to his ascension. Abhigyan Shakuntalam: A Sanskrit play by the ancient Indian poet Klidsa, dramatizing the story of Shakuntala told in Mahabharata. Or even Raghuvansh Mahakvya which is a Sanskrit Mahakavya by the most celebrated Sanskrit poet Kalidasa from the 5th century CE. It narrates, in 19 Sargas, the stories related to the Raghu dynasty, namely the family of Dilipa and his descendants up to Agnivarna, who include Raghu, Dasharatha and Rama.

Essentially, when one looks at what Professor Khan calls just dramas that have nothing to do with religion, one sees that the scriptures he talks of are deeply rooted in Sanatan Dharma. They are about our Gods and God-Kings who we, till date, revere. The fact that Professor Khan thinks these epics have nothing to do with religion, should in itself be a problem with his appointment to the Dharma Vigyan department because the students of the department do not view these epics as dramas that have nothing to do with religion.

I personally worship a Sati Goddess. There is a paath that details her life that we call Mangal paath. It is in the form of poetry. Now for someone who doesnt worship the Sati Goddess, it is just poetry that has nothing to do with religion. But for me, it is one of the most sacred texts. Similarly, the Bhagawat Gita in its original form is written in Sanskrit. However, there is another form of it called the Hari Gita, which is in Hindi poetic couplets. For a Sanatani, does Hari Gita become a drama that has nothing to do with religion, or is it as revered?

Read: We perform Purohit Karm, we do not want Sanatan Dharma studies get influenced by Islam or Christianity: Protesting students at BHU

It must be mentioned here that I dont have the knowledge or the expertise to question Professor Khans scholarship and in no capacity, am I trying to do so. I am simply trying to infer, from his own words, whether his scholarship is in tune with faith that is the central focus of the Dharma Vigyan department. And hence, it becomes necessary to clarify that I come from a place of faith, and not scholarship, which is the crux of the BHU controversy, to begin with.

One has to ask a very important question in this context why would a student enrol himself in the Dharma Vigyan department of BHU? If a student enrols for an MBA, one can safely assume that he intends to work in the corporate sector in tune with his specialisation, which could be Marketing, Finance, Supply Chain Management, so on and so forth. When a student enrols for Mass Communication, one might safely assume that the students interests lie with fields like Journalism, for example. Now, when these students enrol in the Dharma Vigyan department, are they doing so to learn literature, or are they doing so to understand, learn about and pursue religious endeavours. If they had enrolled to merely learn literature, why would they enrol in Dharma Vigyan and not the Arts department?

Read: The BHU controversy: Demanding that Hindu Dharma Vigyan be taught by a Hindu and not a Muslim is not bigotry

Extrapolating from the above argument, it is thus safe to assume that the students of Dharma Vigyan enrolled there with the specific purpose of pursuing religious endeavours. While I love my faith and hold it very very dear, would not take it up as an academic exercise because my vocation lies elsewhere. But for these students, their faith is their vocation.

Do these students deserve to be called bigots simply because they want the sanctity of their vocation to be preserved? Should they necessarily submit to secular ethos when their vocation itself is rooted is faith? Would we call a student of Physics a bigot if he doesnt want to learn about his subject from a Historian who might not understand the nuances of the subject? On the other side of the debate, is it alright for a man studying his faith as a vocation to be called a bigot if he doesnt want a man, who calls parts of his faith as dramas that have nothing to do with religion teaching him? The manner in which these Dharmics have been vilified is patently grotesque.

That brings me to the article published in Swarajya Magazine by Arihant Pawariya. Arihant is a friend whose journalism I deeply respect, however, in this matter, I daresay, he has been grossly off the mark.

The first argument that Arihant makes is that the family of Professor Khan is rooted in Indian culture and hence, protesting against him is counterproductive. My respect for Professor Khan increases manifold when I hear how his family has been rooted in Sanskrit and that his father would sing Bhajans and take care of Gaushalas. However, his family history has nothing do with the fact that he is in fact by all standards, someone who the students of Dharma Vigyan might not want to learn from.

Further, Arihant, in essence, says that a qualified Muslim professor is far better than a Hindu professor who is not as qualified as him. While on the face of it, this argument holds utmost merit, one needs to understand that this course itself is rooted in faith. And hence, his personal faith is as much a part of his qualification as his Sanskrit scholarship. That he believes that certain epics are dramas with nothing to do with religion vindicates that point further.

Arihant says, Dr Khan will be joining the most secular of these departments. He will be teaching literature. Of course, it would be Sanskrit literature and many scriptures would be a part of the curriculum but its not theology per se.I find this statement deeply problematic as well. Sanskrit as a language, firstly, cannot be secularised completely. It is a gateway to our Vedic wisdom. Secondly, if many scriptures would be a part of the curriculum, how can one assume that it is not related to theology since the students themselves are not learning it as a linguistic or literary effort but as a part of their faith, their scriptures?

Next, the article in Swarajya lists people like Dayanand Saraswati who wrote on Islam or Dr Ambedkar who wrote on Islam but was not an Islamic scholar. The central point being missed here is that none of them was employed to teach students of Islam. Professor Khan, just like anyone else is free to write about Sanatan or Sanskrit, the contention here is not whether a Muslim can write about Sanatan but whether a non-Hindu can teach students of Dharma Vigyan who are taking up faith as a vocation. The right question to ask here is that can a Hindu teach a future Maulvi? The Islamic community would resist and rightly so. A person who has no faith in the scripture he teaches has no business to teach the scripture to students of faith.

Further, he says, Islam has already too many mullahs to issue a fatwa against apostates. Hindu nationalists would do better to side with heretics rather than mullahs. If Muslims, no matter how small a section, want to de-Arabise and Indianise, how can any Hindu nationalist find fault with this? Its a no brainer.

Here, I completely agree with him. Any Sanatani would welcome Muslims learning about Hinduism. Just like it was the Hindus who stood up for Triple Talaq petitioner Ishrat who got death threats for participating in Hanuman Chalisa recital. It was Hindus who stood up for Dilsher Khan who was thrashed for reading Ramayana and Mahabharata.

Read: A Tale of Two Protests: Students at JNU receive a free pass while the students at BHU are demonized for a fair demand

The liberals have drawn on this argument and fallaciously turned this into a Hindu bigots uniting against Muslims argument. For the sake of argument, even if we do accept this theory, one has to ask why these liberals did not stand up for Ishrat or Dilshad? Where was the outrage when Muslims were uniting against these Muslims?

Essentially, in the Swarajya article says that the BHU protestors are entitled juveniles and them, including the ones supporting them, are bigots. A bigot essentially is a person who is intolerant towards those holding different opinions. One has to wonder who is the real bigot here? The BHU students who want to assert their right of learning Dharma from someone who holds the same faith, unequivocally, or those who are calling them bigots for holding a different opinion and not conforming to the touted secular ethos?

The one argument that I repeatedly came across from various quarters that BHU students not wanting to learn Dharma from a non-Hindu is the same as Brahmins not wanting to the lower-castes to learn the scriptures. Here, I would like the shed the veil of subtlety and be categoric. Firstly, it is patently sinister to bring in the caste argument when the discussion is about Hindus vs non-Hindus. There is something extremely baleful since this argument aims to equate non-Hindus to lower caste Hindus and Hindus to Brahmins thereby insinuating that those who are not Brahmins are not Hindus. Nobody can deny that caste discrimination is real and a termite that has only weakened Hinduism. But in the context of BHU and the current controversy, the Hindu students of Dharma dont wish to learn about their faith from a non-Hindu, there is no assertion that they do not wish to learn from castes other than Brahmins. This argument can only be considered a Leftist-Islamist agenda to drive a wedge in the Hindu community.

The other extremely misplaced, if not sinister argument is that Hinduism is inclusive and hence, the focus should not be on the religion of the Guru but his knowledge. As already established, his knowledge of Sanskrit is not a contention, his faith is. Secondly, it becomes important here to draw a comparison between Pluralism and Secularism. Hinduism is Plural. It takes everyone along and even under Hindu supremacy, non-Hindus are not discriminated against, unlike Islamic nations. However, pluralism cannot mean that Hindus need to give up claim on all things Hindus. The problem is that the expectation from the Hindu community is that they should not claim exclusive rights even on faith. When a Ram Mandir is being spoken about, Hindus are bigots if they dont agree to a Masjid being made on Ram Janmabhoomi. When it is about theology, Hindus are bigots if they dont allow a Muslim man to teach them their own faith. The problem is that the starting assumption is that a Hindu is a bigot unless he is willing to give up his claim on his own culture and his own religion.

The BHU students are being called bigots because they refuse to give their claim on their own faith. The BHU students are being called bigots because they are not willing to sacrifice their faith to prove that they are not bigots.

The BHU students are being called bigots because they are Hindus. If the AMU students studying Islamic theology would have said they do not wish to learn about Islam from a Hindu or a Sikh, their demand would have been considered a reasonable demand coming from a place of faith. A reasonable demand of the devout and rightly so. But the BHU students, in the same situation, are bigots. Because a Hindu is always assumed to be one unless he is willing to give up his entire existence to conform to misplaced ideas of secularism.

There are some fundamental truths about human society cannot be denied. Boundaries are important, borders are generally good. Society shouldnt have to abolish boundaries and borders to prove that they are inclusive. Of course, overtime, the boundaries and the borders have to be redefined to include a particular section of society and exclude some others but the abolition of the boundaries themselves must occur after great introspection.

What we are essentially witnessing in BHU is abolition of boundaries not redefining them. The appointment of Dr Firoz Khan in the Dharma Vigyan department of the BHU erases the boundaries between Hindus and Non-Hindus in the teaching of Hindu theology itself. Its a huge boundary and its being abolished without sufficient thought. This could have perilous consequences for the future. Thus, under such circumstances, when we have sufficient reason to believe that the consequences could be grave and not much evidence to suggest for the alternative, preserving the status-quo is the only way forward. The boundaries between Hindus and Non-Hindus ought to be preserved in the current context.

Furthermore, attempts have been made to paint the decision with the brush of caste. Such attempts are worthy of condemnation. Those who wish to bring Jaativad in this argument ought to remember Hindu society has reached a point where it seeks consolidation of Hindus under one banner. Greater unity is sought to be achieved although Jaativad does exist in current society.

However, it is pertinent to mention that Hindu society has redefined certain boundaries over time to open numerous doors to all castes and creed without discrimination but, at the same time, Hindu society does not wish to accord the same privileges to someone who is not a Hindu. Thus, essentially, what has occurred over the years is the redefinition of boundaries, not the abolition of it. Thus, the issue of BHU does not have an ounce of casteism in it.

Inclusiveness without boundaries is one gigantic mess. Not everyone belongs everywhere. All of us know it. We wont allow everyone into our homes or our country even, that is why we oppose illegal immigration. That is the whole premise for the preservation of the traditions of Sabarimala Temple as well. Not all exclusion is discrimination, as J Sai Deepak is fond of saying. And it is the same argument that is being made for the support towards the students of BHU. Dr Firoz Khan may be a scholar of Sanskrit but he is not eligible for teaching Dharma Vigyan to Hindus by virtue of his faith. Only a person who has faith in Hindu theology could ever do justice to that role, and that could only ever be a Hindu.

Editor, OpIndia.com since October 2017

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How the BHU students were demonised and the ones who refused to be secularised unfairly called bigots - OpIndia

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Princeton celebrates 25 years of research and teaching at Mpala, Kenya – Princeton University

Posted: at 7:43 pm

This year, Princeton University is celebrating its 25th anniversary of research, teaching and collaboration at the Mpala Research Centre in Laikipia County, Kenya, while looking toward deepening engagement for the future.

Mpala, an independent Kenyan nonprofit, comprises 48,000 acres of privately owned conservation lands managed by the University in partnership with the Smithsonian Institution, the National Museums of Kenya and the Kenya Wildlife Service.

Mpala is one of the worlds leading field-based research centers for the study of ecology, conservation, public healthand sustainable development," said Aly Kassam-Remtulla, vice provost for international affairs andoperations (acting). "It offers a unique opportunity for Kenyan and international scholars to conduct experiments on a landscape scale. It also has unique resources including the first field-based genomics laboratory in Africa.As we mark our silver anniversary, we see opportunities for greater engagement of Princeton students and scholars, African scientists and conservationists, and many other neighbors and partners in the Laikipia region. Watch a documentaryon Mpala.

The documentary "Mpala: A Living Landscape" focuses on the Mpala Research Centre in central Kenya's Laikipia County, which combines a natural habitat teeming with wildlife, livestock operations and cutting-edge scientific research facilities. The center provides unique research opportunities to a global community of scientists and students.

Video by Princeton University and Talking Eyes

Located on the savannahs stretching north of Mount Kenya, Mpala is a living laboratory with an expansive and diverse natural terrain teeming with wildlife, including black rhinos, elephants, giraffes, lions, leopards, Grvys zebras and hundreds of bird species.

Mpala comprises 48,000 acres of conserved land in Laikipia County, Kenya.

A portion of the reserve is devoted to grazing lands for small-scale ranchersand farmers in the surrounding communities to raise cash and subsistence crops.

The wildlife-human connection is a crucial area of engagement for the center, where large-scale field experiments happen alongside educational experiences that bring together Princeton and Kenyan students.

What goes on in Mpala exemplifies perfectly what we aim at here at Princeton, which is a seamless blending of teaching and research with faculty and students working together, Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgruber said in a recent documentary about Mpala. One of the genuinely special things about Mpala is the way that it takes students out of the world that they've known and exposes them to things that are utterly different, and some of that is about what it means to do research on the ground in a place unlike where they've been before.

The vision for Mpala is to deepen the work in science and conservation, further engage scholars in the humanities, social sciences and engineering, and to boost education, research and engagement opportunities for Kenyans and scientists from other parts of Africa. To help support these initiatives, the infrastructure of the site also will need to be enhanced, such as adding solar panels, water collection, storage and treatment systems, additional laboratory infrastructure,and enhanced high-speed internet access.

I see a future of Mpala where we robustly engage in solving the problems that we face, whether in Africa or globally, by bringing the brilliance and passion and curiosity of students and scientists from around the world to really make a difference, said Dino Martins, Mpalas executive director who is also a lecturer and visiting research scholar in ecology and evolutionary biology.

Princeton students interested in conservation, ecology, biology and anthropologyhave long benefited from the chance to study at Mpala as part of courses or for research projects.

Dan Rubenstein (center), Princeton's Class of 1877 Professor of Zoology and professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, has had a long association with Mpala. His research on the endangered Grvy's zebra has shown that the animalsbenefit livestock by eating the rough grass stems and seeds that cattle cannot digest, despite the widely held belief that the zebras compete with livestock for scarce food resources.

Photo by

Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute

Teaching in the field is completely different from teaching on campus, said Dan Rubenstein, the Class of 1877 Professor of Zoology and professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and director of the Program in Environmental Studies, who has had an extensive association with Mpala. When they [students] come to a field setting, its total immersion from dawn til way after dusk. And we become partners in generating knowledge.

In 1989, George Small of the Class of 1943 approached the University about establishing a research center on the large ranch he inherited from his brother.Since then, Princeton faculty and students have studied biodiversity, climate change, conservation, ecology, water use and other topics in partnership with local scientists and residents. Mpala is a dynamic ecosystem with arid grasslands as well as lush riverside woodlands, where researchers can study environmental pressures and the impacts of climate change. Such findings can help inform regional governments and organizations about measures to help protect the environment in East Africa and beyond.

Among research projects at Mpala is using DNA analysis of animal fecal samples, including from elephants,to illuminate links between environment, diet and gut microbes.

Photo by Robert Pringle, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Further, Mpala helps build connections with the wider community through education as well as efforts such as a county-wide rabies vaccination programfor dogs, with the goal of eradicating this deadly disease from the landscape, protecting people, livestock and wildlife. Residents also have actively participated in the centers research. A particularly illustrative example is the Great Grvys Rally, in which Rubenstein and other scientists engaged volunteers to spot the endangered Grvys zebra to learn more about its population and range.

Scientific research at Mpala spans numerous endeavors, including studying how termite mounds store nutrients and moisture, thus helping prevent the spread of deserts; using DNA to learn how multiple species of plant-eating animals can coexist in the same habitat with the same food sources, with implications for conservation; and how wildlife and cattle can be partners, not enemies, in the search for food, which could help stem the encroachment of cattle ranching on wildlife habitat.

The Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology offers a four-course program on tropical biology and sustainability at Mpalaand other sites in Kenya.

Photo by

Danielle Alio, Office of Communications

Raised in Kenya, Kennedy Saitoti Omufwoko studied in Mpala and at the University of Nairobi before coming to Princeton to pursue a Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology. Hes building on his research on ecological perspectives on bees.

Mpala is a very big shaping part of my life. Its where I really gathered a lot of my research experience, Saitoti said. Im studying the evolution of social behavior in bees. Princeton offered one of those labs that actually was looking into that. It was a perfect match for me.

The possibilities for learning at Mpala extend to Princeton students no matter their academic concentrations. For example, the Holly and Henry Wendt, Class of 1955, Global Seminar, Documentary Filmmaking in Kenya: Visual Storytelling on Wildlife and Wildlands Conservation, invitedundergraduates to shoot short films. Additionally, the anthropology course Human Evolution has visited Mpala to study the local culture and how humans have interacted with the wildlife and climate in the area for thousands of years.

As part of the anthropology course "Human Evolution,"Princeton students visit residents of II Motiok, one of several group homesteads situated on the Naibunga Conservancy on the northern border of Mpala.

Photo by

Danielle Alio, Office of Communications

Paula Kahumbu, who grew up in Kenya, earned her Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology from Princeton in 2002. She visited Mpala as a graduate student and now teaches at the center and leads conservation efforts in Kenya as CEO of the nonprofit WildlifeDirect.

There was no center, we camped by the riverside, we cooked our own meals, we slept in littlepup tents, and it was amazing, Kahumbu said of her first visit. The place was teeming with wildlife. Since then it's been really exciting to see how it's blossomed into this international institution that is providing a base for African scientists who can interact with scientists all over the world.

After graduating from Princeton in 2017 with a degree in ecology and evolutionary biology, Zoe Sims spent a year atMpala on a Princeton in Africa fellowship. As human beings, we are part of our ecosystems, everywhere we are, she said. I find that being hereat Mpala, in Kenya, Im more acutely aware of that fact partly because every morning I wake up to the sound of guinea fowl in the bushes outside my room, and many days I go to sleep at night to the sound of hyenas in the distance calling to each other, she said. All of these things are just these reminders that I am part of nature.

Anniversary events were held at Mpala in June, Princeton this November, and are forthcoming in Chicago, Florida, London and Nairobi.

Students reach the top of Mt. Mukenya, the highest point on the Mpala ranch.

Photo by

Danielle Alio, Office of Communications

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The global pest control services market is likely to grow at a CAGR of over 4% during the period 2019-2025 – Yahoo Finance

Posted: November 19, 2019 at 11:45 am

NEW YORK, Nov. 18, 2019 /PRNewswire/ --

The global pest control services market is likely to grow at a CAGR of over 4% during the period 20192025.

Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05827566/?utm_source=PRN

The global pest control services market is witnessing a flurry of mergers and acquisition activities. The market is currently in the customer acquisition mode, and vendors are experimenting with value-added services and bundled offerings to gain customers' attention. There exists no uniformity on the global scale with respect to demand, labor cost, and application methods. They largely depend on the customer buying power and the economic condition of the country. Pest control services market is a labor-intensive industry, and growing economic activities reinforce its growth. The industry is highly competitive, as a large number of vendors characterizes it. For instance, in India, nearly 40% of the market is unorganized. The number of vendors in the organized sector has also increased, thereby affecting the industry in a multi-faceted manner.

The following factors are likely to contribute to the growth of the global pest control services market during the forecast period: Increase in Vector-borne Diseases Increased Pesticide Resistance Pest Insurance Coverage Growth in Mergers and Acquisitions Activities

The study considers the present scenario of the global pest control services market and its market dynamics for the period 2020?2025. The report covers a detailed overview of several market growth enablers, restraints, and trends. It covers both the demand and supply aspect of the market. It profiles and examines leading and prominent companies operating in the market.

Pest Control Services Market: Segmentation

This market research report includes detailed segmentation by product types, applications, control types, and geography. The demand for general pest control services is higher in several geographies than termite control services. Japan, Europe, and North America are the major countries where termite treatment services are mainly high because the application of wood in these regions is high both in residential and commercial sectors. Factors such as the growth of viral diseases, improvement in living standards, and the growth of the population are driving the segment. The rise in the housing market in the developed countries is bolstering the termite treatment business. The regulatory push in the pre-construction industry is further supporting the growth of termite control services.

While the demand for non-chemical alternatives is increasing, especially from developed regions, developing countries are heavily dependent on chemical methods. Mechanical methods are limited to a certain type of bugs and have been losing share to chemical methods. The ease of availability and cost-effectiveness of chemical solutions are the major reasons for their high adoption. On the other hand, the lack of complexity in regulations with respect to the usage of mechanical or physical devices is preferred by service providers. APAC and Latin America are the major end-users of mechanical methods.

The demand for residential pest control services is higher in Europe and North America than in APAC and Latin America. Globally, the demand is growing as climatic conditions vary across the region, and the requirement in each of the regions varies accordingly. However, the demand for mosquito eradication, termite extermination, and rodent control solutions is high in the residential sector.

Market Segmentation by Pest Type General Pest Control Termite ControlMarket Segmentation by Type Chemical Mechanical Other Pest Control MethodsMarket Segmentation by Application Residential Commercial Industrial Others

Geographical Segmentation

The demand in North America is promising across application categories with end-user sectors preferring professionals than using DIY products. The high usage of wood in buildings, both residential and commercial sectors, provides significant opportunities for service providers. The region is expected to lead the global market during the forecast period, as the pest-free environment is accorded high priorities across application segments.

The growth of construction activities and the high prevalence of vector-borne diseases are major factors contributing to the growth in APAC. Moreover, the rise in the construction of commercial spaces - hospitality, airports, and industrial clusters - has tremendously contributed to the growth of the APAC pest control market.

Market Segmentation by Geography North Americao USo Canada Europeo Italyo Germanyo Franceo UKo Spain APACo Chinao Japano Australiao South Koreao Malaysia Latin Americao Brazilo Mexicoo Argentinao Chile MEAo Turkeyo South Africao Egypto Saudi Arabiao UAE

Key Vendor AnalysisThe competition is intense, with several global, regional, and local players. The market is fragmented with only a few players occupying major shares. Vendors are implementing innovative products and services such as digital services and focusing on developing service portfolios to gain a higher share. The focus is shifting toward the digitization of pest control services or developing mobile supporting applications to enhance the customer's experience.

Key Vendors Anticimex Ecolab Rentokil Initial Rollins Terminix Truly Nolen Massey Services Inc.

Other Prominent Vendors Dodson Pest Control Lindsey Pest Services Cook's Pest Control Clark Pest Control Florida Pest Control Arrow Exterminators Hulett Environmental Services Rose Pest Solutions JG Pest Control Cleankill Pest Control Eastern Termite & Pest Control

Key Market InsightsThe analysis of the pest control market provides sizing and growth opportunities for the forecast period 20202025. Offers market sizing and growth prospects of the market for the forecast period 20202025 Provides comprehensive insights on the latest industry trends, forecast, and growth drivers in the market Includes a detailed analysis of growth drivers, challenges, and investment opportunities Delivers a complete overview of segments and the regional outlook of the market Offers an exhaustive summary of the vendor landscape, competitive analysis, and key strategies to gain competitive advantage

Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05827566/?utm_source=PRN

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The global pest control services market is likely to grow at a CAGR of over 4% during the period 2019-2025 - Yahoo Finance

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Global Pest Control Services Market 2019 by Manufacturers, Regions, Type and Application, Forecast to 2025 – News Agree

Posted: at 11:45 am

The Pest Control Services Market report gives a purposeful depiction of the area by the practice for research, amalgamation, and review of data taken from various sources. The market analysts have displayed the different sidelines of the area with a point on recognizing the top players (Anticimex, Ecolab, Rentokil Initial, Rollins, ServiceMaster) of the industry. The Pest Control Services market report correspondingly joins a predefined business market from a SWOT investigation of the real players. Thus, the data summarized out is, no matter how you look at it is, reliable and the result of expansive research.

This report mulls over Pest Control Services showcase on the classification, for instance, application, concords, innovations, income, improvement rate, import, and others (Residential, Commercial) in the estimated time from 20192025 on a global stage. In like manner, the overall Pest Control Services market report reveals knowledge identified with the type of product, its applications, customers, prime players, and various components agreeing with the account. This first data demonstrates critical contenders and their definite picture of the general Pest Control Services market. Other than this, the report further demonstrates expected market power, challenges, and prospects in the Pest Control Services market.

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The report gives a broad explanation of the presence of the Pest Control Services market in different regions and countries. With an extensive regional analysis of the Pest Control Services market, the research analysts make an attempt to unveil hidden growth prospects available for players in different parts of the world. They accurately estimate market share, CAGR, production, consumption, price, revenue, and other crucial factors that indicate the growth of regional markets studied in the report. They also shed light on the presence of prominent players in regional markets, and how it is making a difference in the growth of the regional markets. The main objectives of the research report elaborate the overall market overview on Pest Control Services market dynamics, historic volume and value, robust market methodology, current & future trends, Porters Five Forces Analysis, upstream and downstream industry chain, new technological development, cost structure, government policies & regulations, etc.

Pest Control Services Market report segmentation on Major Product Type:General Pest Control, Termite Control

The global version of this report with a geographical classification such as

North America (the United States, Canada, and Mexico)Europe (Germany, UK, France, Italy, Russia, Spain, and Benelux)Asia Pacific (China, Japan, India, Southeast Asia, and Australia)Latin America (Brazil, Argentina, and Colombia)The Middle East and Africa

Reason to buy Pest Control Services Market Report : 1) Breakdown of the sales data at the country level, with sales, revenue and market share for key countries in the world, from 2014 to 2019.2) The Pest Control Services competitive situation, sales, revenue and global market share of top manufacturers are analyzed emphatically by landscape contrast.3) Describe Pest Control Services sales channel, distributors, customers, research findings and conclusion, appendix and data source.4) The details of the competitive landscape outlined in this report are likely to provide an analysis of the prominent industry vendors, their growth profiles, strategies, and tactics, etc., that would help investors in decision-making.5) To project the size of Pest Control Services submarkets, with respect to key regions (along with their respective key countries).6) To strategically profile the key players and comprehensively analyze their growth strategies.7) Focuses on the key global Pest Control Services players, to define, describe and analyze the value, market share, market competition landscape, SWOT analysis and development plans in the next few years.

This report contributes an overall summary of the global Pest Control Services market, including business perspectives, market strategies, assembles data related to various business firms, its year of establishment, contact information, market outline, sales revenue, industry segments, the business most prestigious location, and regional presence. The report includes several plans and policies related to the Pest Control Services industry, moreover, it describes the management process, product appearance, manufacturing cost, and market volume. In addition, the global Pest Control Services market report implicates financial usage, the quantity of product, chain format, demand and supply ratio. This report justifies the various business trends followed by the marketing sectors as well as the distributors of the Pest Control Services industry.

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The next part also sheds light on the gap between supply and consumption. Apart from the mentioned information, the growth rate of the Pest Control Services market in 2023 is also explained. Finally, the possibility analysis of new project investment is done in the report, which contains a comprehensive SWOT analysis of the Pest Control Services market.

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It’s the other way around — termites produce approximately one-tenth of the carbon dioxide emissions created by humans – AFP Factcheck

Posted: at 11:44 am

A meme shared hundreds of times in multiple posts on Facebook and Twitter claims that termites produce 10times more carbon dioxide than humans in a single year. The claim is false; scientists estimate termites carbon emissions are approximately one-tenth of those created by humans.

The meme was published in thisFacebook post on October 22, 2019.

The meme features several large termites alongside an image of teenage climate change activistGreta Thunberg and a quote fromthisspeech she made at the United Nations on September 23, 2019.

Text superimposed on the image states: Termites produce 10 x more CO2 [sic] than MAN in the whole world in a YEAR!

Below is a screenshot of the misleading post:

The meme was also shared on Facebook here, here,hereand here, where it has been shared more than 1,300 times;and on Twitter hereand here.

The claim is false; scientists estimate termites produce approximately one-tenth of the carbon emissions produced by humans in a single year.

Professor Stefan Arndt, from the University of Melbournes School of Ecosystem and Forest Sciences, told AFP the misleading claim was in fact the other way around.

Termites only emit a tenth of the overall emissions humans create every year, in terms of anthropogenic fossil fuel emissions, Arndt said via email on October 29, 2019.

This academic study,written by academics in Japan, Malaysia and the UK in 2000, estimated termites emit 3,540 teragrams, or 3.54 Gigatonnes of CO2 in a year.

Below is a screenshot of the table of these emissions estimates, which appears on page 425 of the study:

The Global Carbon Project, a US-based environmental research organisation, stated in this2018 report there were 36.2 Gigatonnes of CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry in 2017.

Below is a screenshot of the report with the section highlighted in red by AFP:

Arndt noted that termites are part of the natural carbon cycle, so any CO2 that is emitted by a termite is sequestered again by a plant.

Hence, termites are de facto carbon neutral, he said. This would only change if we [were to] get more and more termites, then their CO2 emissions could rise, as plants may not be able to keep up with the sequestration. This is pretty much what happens with human induced CO2 emissions from fossil fuel sources. The CO2 [is] rising so rapidly that plants cannot keep up.

In fact, CO2 emissions have risen per decade by about 3.1 Giga tonne of CO2, pretty much what the CO2 emissions from termites are per year. Hence, the human CO2 emissions increase every year by 1/10 of the global termite CO2 emissions.

Importantly, termite populations do not seem to increase globally, so we really do not have to worry about them. Unless you live in a wooden house of course, then you better watch out for them.

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It's the other way around -- termites produce approximately one-tenth of the carbon dioxide emissions created by humans - AFP Factcheck

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What the termite mound ‘snowmen’ of the NT can tell us about human nature – The Conversation AU

Posted: at 11:44 am

The Stuart Highway in the Northern Territory is dotted with around 300 termite mounds, dressed as people. They are reminiscent of giant, ochre coloured snowmen in their distinctly human forms of decoration.

These tall, colourful mounds variously sport scarves, caps, singlets, shirts, sunhats, bras, hard hats and even a beer can. They start just below Darwin, near the Noonamah Hotel, and occur all the way down to Kulgara, just north of the South Australian border. This covers around 1,800 kilometres.

The snowmen are an irreverent, larrikin, Northern Territorian phenomenon. But who created them? And what can they teach us about fundamental human behaviours?

Termite mounds occur naturally. They are made of clay, soil, sand and other natural materials, bound together with the saliva of termites. They occur globally and can reach as high as five metres.

In the NT, the first snowmen appeared during the 1970s. More quickly followed. They appear on both public and private land, lining major highways and rural roads and extending into national parks.

Over the years, many people have made these snowmen. Some were made by roadworkers, staying at roadside camps along the highway, with limited access to towns and entertainment but plenty of work clothing. Some were made by the owners of rural and remote properties. Some were made by fisherman traversing to remote fishing locations. Some may have been decorated by tourists.

The manager of the Royal Flying Doctor Service Tourist Facility, Samantha Bennett, is a Territorian born and bred. She says of the mounds:

Sometimes the clothing is changed according to festive calenders. They dont do Halloween, but they definitely do Christmas and Australia Day. They dress them up with flags and high viz clothing, which is cool because you can see them from a distance. Sometimes, they are used to help with directions. They mark the location of a driveway in a remote area or turnoffs to secret fishing spots.

The snowmen are actually snow people men, women and children. Some are arranged in family groups. Gender is marked by clothing. Economic status can be discerned through the use of silk scarves, resort wear or hard hats.

The NT has the highest rate of beer drinking in Australia. Not that long ago, it had the highest rate of alcohol consumption in the world. Perhaps unsurprisingly then, beer cans are held by some snowmen.

The snowmen are part of a wider cultural landscape in the NT. If you go to the Coburg Peninsula and lose one of your thongs, you put the remaining thong on the thong tree: a tree covered top to bottom with old rubber thongs.

Then there is the fence of shame on Andreas Avenue at Dundee Beach, west of Darwin. This is where you put your fishing rod if you have broken it during your trip.

There is material evidence that the snowman tradition has some longevity. In some cases, the clothing is in a dilapidated state. In others, the termites have renewed their building efforts on top of the clothes.

It is unlikely that the snowmen were created by Aboriginal people. As Barunga resident Isaac Pamakal explains: Aboriginal people dont do that, because that might make people sick.

Termite mounds are woven into NT Aboriginal belief systems. In some areas, there is a belief that anyone who knocks over a mound will get diarrhoea. Indeed, powerful Indigenous people have been known to put someones clothes onto a termite mound in order to make that person sick. The intended victim would be identified by the sweat on their clothing (which contains their DNA). (This link between sweat and DNA is an example of Indigenous science, which is increasingly being drawn on.)

However, termite mounds are mostly known, in the NT and around the world, for their medicinal properties. They contain high proportions of kaolin, used for the treatment of gastric-disorders in both traditional and modern pharmacologies.

Francoise Foti has conducted research in two NT Aboriginal communities, Nauiyu Nambiyu (Daly River) and Elliott. She records people consuming small quantities of termite mounds to deal with gastric disorders or after eating certain foods like yams, turtle or goannas. Similarly, termite mound material is sometimes eaten during pregnancy or lactation as it contains iron and calcium.

The urge to humanise inanimate objects is a global phenomenon through both time and space. For thousands of years, humans have had a penchant for making animals and things look like people.

This is most clearly shown in a style of rock art known as therianthropes, which depicts beings that have both human and animal characteristics. It also manifests in depictions of mermaids, centaurs and other mythical creatures.

So while they are special, the snowmen of the NT are not unique. They are simply another example of a human need to reinvent the world in our own image.

See more here:
What the termite mound 'snowmen' of the NT can tell us about human nature - The Conversation AU

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