NYC Termite Pest Control Extermination Operators, Inspection, Fumigation and Treatment


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Margaret Kuo’s restaurant reopens – Main Line

Posted: August 1, 2017 at 7:41 pm

Radnor >> After complying will all the requirements and passing a new inspection on Monday, Margaret Kuos in Wayne reopened its doors. Larry Taltoan, Radnor Township health inspector, ordered the well-known Chinese eatery closed after it failed an inspection last week. At that time, owner Margaret Kuo said that they would work with authorities to take care of any problems.

Everything is back to normal, her husband, Warren Kuo, said on Tuesday. He said they have met with employees and now everybody is on the same page.

Its our heart and soul, Warren Kuo said about the Chinese restaurant which is marking its 15th anniversary in Wayne this year. There is no absentee management.

He insisted that there were no rodents or roaches in the restaurant.

A July 31 letter from David Earwood with Modern Exterminating & Termite Co. stated: After doing a thorough inspection of the property, it is my professional opinion that there is neither a rodent or pest infestation at this location.

Also, May and June receipts from Wilson Pest Control found the sanitation at the site was good.

Asked via email about the finding by an outside contractor that there were no rodents present in the restaurant, Taltoan had no comment.

The Kuos own two other restaurants, Margaret Kuos in Media and Mandarin in Malvern. Margaret Kuo has received many awards for her cooking over the years. She is known for her authentic Peking duck recipe and both Taiwanese and northern Chinese cuisine. The Wayne restaurant also has a traditional Japanese sushi bar upstairs.

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One of country’s largest pest control companies, based in Reading … – Lehigh Valley Business

Posted: at 7:40 pm

Rentokil-Steritech North America, based in Reading, merged with Connor’s Termite and Pest. (Contributed)

Reading-based Rentokil Steritech North America, one of the country’s largest pest control companies, has merged with a Virginia exterminator company, according to news reports.

Connors Termite and Pest Control of Springfield was founded in 1974 and serves residential and commercial customers in the northern Virginia/Washington, D.C. area.

The merger adds nearly 100 new full-time employees, including 53 technician specialists, to Rentokil Steritech, according to reports.

Rentokil Steritech North America was formed in 2015 when Rentokil Initial acquired the Steritech Group based in Charlotte, N.C., for $425 million. Rentolkil-Steritech represents the North American division of Rentokil Initial PLC, headquartered in Camberley, England, which operates in more than 60 countries.

In 2006, Rentolkil Initial acquired Ehrlich Pest Control, a private, family owned company based in Reading that was founded in 1928. Ehrlich was the countrys fourth largest pest control company in the United States. The deal was worth a reported $142 million.

Some of Rentokil Steritechs other regional pest control brands include Western Exterminator and Presto-X.

Rentokil Steritechs merger with Connors closed May 1, according to reports.

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Rentokil Steritch Acquires Connor’s Termite and Pest Control – PCT Magazine

Posted: July 31, 2017 at 9:42 am

READING, Pa. Rentokil Steritech announced the merger of Connors Termite and Pest Control, headquartered in Springfield, Virginia and servicing the Washington, D.C., Virginia and Maryland markets. This merger strengthens Rentokil Steritechs residential and commercial service capabilities across the Northern Virginia market and expands the companys reputation for providing outstanding pest control services to both residential and commercial customers. The transaction closed May 1 and terms were not disclosed.

The merger with Connors adds nearly 100 new full-time employees to the Rentokil Steritech team, including 53 technician specialists. Founded in 1974, Connors brings its well respected residential and commercial capabilities to Rentokil Steritech. The current leadership, including Robin Mountjoy and Eddie Connor Jr. (children of founder Ed Connor Sr.) will continue to lead the operations post Closing to integrate and grow the business.

The merger with Connors is an important step for Rentokil Steritech as it further expands our reach within the high-growth and prosperous metro D.C. market and it greatly strengthens our service capabilities said John Myers, President and CEO, Rentokil Steritech. We are excited to welcome almost 100 new employees to Rentokil.

We are proud to be joining the Rentokil Steritech family. Our company had a choice between multiple buyers, but our leadership teams unanimous view was that Connors strengths and business culture were best aligned with Rentokil Steritech, and the local Ehrlich team said Eddie Connor, Jr.

Lance Tullius, LR Tullius, Inc., represented and acted as exclusive financial advisor to Connors Termite and Pest Control.

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Death notices received July 24-28 | Obituaries | berkeleyind.com – Berkeley Independent

Posted: at 9:41 am

AHERN, Naomi Christine, 86, of Goose Creek, a retired registered nurse and widow of Jack Ahern, died July 27. Arrangements by Palmetto Cremation Society of Charleston.

BAILEY, Carl Bill, 85, of Bonneau, an Air Force veteran, died July 22. Arrangements by Simplicity Lowcountry Cremation and Burial Services’ North Charleston Chapel.

BALLARD, Maria Lourdes Silver, 47, of Goose Creek, a nurse and translator with MUSC, First Health employee and wife of Kenneth J. Ballard, died July 24. Arrangements by Stuhr’s Northwoods Chapel of North Charleston.

BESS, Nathaniel, of Huger died July 27. Arrangements by Smith-McNeal’s Awendaw Chapel.

BILLINGS, Karie Thomason, 55, of Hanahan, wife of Joseph Billings, died July 27. Arrangements by Simplicity Lowcountry Cremation and Burial Services’ North Charleston Chapel.

CHRISTOPHER, Jimmy G.B., 79, of Ladson, a master craftsman tile setter, died July 28. Arrangements by Carolina Memorial Funeral Home of North Charleston.

DRAPER, Harold Jr., 77, of Summerville, an Army veteran and husband of Barbara Draper, died July 23. Arrangements by Simplicity Lowcountry Cremation and Burial Services’ Summerville Chapel.

DRIGGERS, Senie Craven, 61, of Moncks Corner, a homemaker and wife of Clayton Driggers Jr., died July 30. Arrangements by Dial-Murray Funeral Home.

DROSE, Joe O. Jr., 81, of Pineville, a Navy veteran and owner and operator of Joe’s Guide Service, died July 27. Arrangements by Dial-Murray Funeral Home of Moncks Corner.

DYKSTRA, Alan John, 65, of Moncks Corner, an employee of Advance Auto Parts, died July 30. Arrangements by Parks Funeral Home of Summerville.

FELDER, Sam Jr., of Goose Creek, has died. Arrangements by Aiken-Capers Funeral Home of Summerville.

FERGUSON, Walter, 83, of Cross, husband of Dorothy Ferguson, died July 23. Arrangements by Eutawville Community Home.

HARRIS, Lambert, 51, of Moncks Corner, an Air Force veteran and mechanic technician with Boeing, died July 25. Arrangements by Gethers Funeral Home of Moncks Corner.

HAYES, Gerald, 77, of Moncks Corner, husband of Joan Hayes, died July 26. Arrangements by Simplicity Lowcountry Cremation and Burial Services’ Summerville Chapel.

HUDSON, Earnest, 72, of Moncks Corner, a truck driver, died July 20. Arrangements by Scott’s Mortuary.

JERIDEAU, David T., 32, of Moncks Corner died July 25. Arrangements by Palmetto Mortuary of Charleston.

JONES, Billy Eugene, 76, of Bonneau, an Army veteran, retired electrician with C.R. Bard and widower of Frances Mae Richardson Jones, died July 30. Arrangements by Dial-Murray Funeral Home of Moncks Corner.

LONG, Doyle N., 75, of Moncks Corner, a Marine Corps veteran, retired superintendent with Gulfstream Construction and husband of Sirita Dangerfield Long, died July 30. Arrangements by Dial-Murray Funeral Home.

NEWCOMB, Wesley D. Jr., 73, of Goose Creek, an Army and Air Force Reserve veteran, sheet metal mechanic and husband of Shirley R. Newcomb, died July 23. Arrangements by Parks Funeral Home of Summerville.

NOLE-AGBEWORNU, Pearl, 61, of Huger, died July 25. Arrangements by Smith-McNeal’s Awendaw Chapel.

POOL, Ronald Keith, 78, of Goose Creek a retired Navy radioman first class, retired security director with the Charleston Naval Shipyard, realtor with Carolina One and Metro North and husband Faye Phillips Pool, died July 30. Arrangements by Stuhr’s Northwoods Chapel of North Charleston.

SALTER, Patricia Gail, 60, of Moncks Corner died July 22. Arrangements by Charleston Cremation Center and Funeral Home.

SPILLER, Carol Jane, 73, of Goose Creek, a tax preparer and wife of Walter Spiller Jr., died July 28. Arrangements by McAlister’s-Smith’s Goose Creek Chapel.

SUMMERS-BEAUFORT, Burness Collins, 69, of Hanahan, a retired licensed practical nurse with Medical University of South Carolina and the Berkeley County Disability Board, died July 30. Arrangements by Dickerson Mortuary of North Charleston.

TABER, Florence Leone, 86, of Goose Creek died July 24. Arrangements by Simplicity Lowcountry Cremation and Burial Services’ North Charleston Chapel.

TAYLOR, Glennie, 98, of Huger died July 25. Arrangements by Scott’s Mortuary of Moncks Corner.

TETTLETON, Bryan Kevin, 45, of Moncks Corner, a termite technician with Palmetto Exterminators and husband of Yvonne Herndon Tettleton, died July 25. Arrangements by Simplicity Lowcountry Cremation and Burial Services’ Summerville Chapel.

TODD, Arlo Clemence, 81, of Summerville, a Navy veteran, died July 26. Arrangements by Simplicity Lowcountry Cremation and Burial Services’ North Charleston Chapel.

TUTEN, Ellen Marie Morris, of Goose Creek, formerly of North Charleston, an employee of Commissioners of Public Works and Hill-Rom and wife of James C. Tuten, died July 26. Arrangements by Carolina Memorial Funeral Home of North Charleston.

TWINING, Margaret M., 68, of Hanahan died July 23. Arrangements by Simplicity Lowcountry Cremation and Burial Services’ North Charleston Chapel.

TYLER, Linda, of Pineville died July 24. Arrangements by Aiken-Capers Funeral Home of Summerville.

WADFORD, Shirley Ann Timmons, 69, of St. Stephen, a former certified nursing assistant with Magnolia Manor, died July 30. Arrangements by Dial-Murray Funeral Home of Moncks Corner.

WHITE, Robert L., of Moncks Corner died July 31. Arrangements by Walker’s Mortuary of Johns Island.

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Wood-hungry termites have intricate caste system – Blair Enterprise Publishing

Posted: at 9:40 am

Termites are insects closely related to cockroaches, and are among the most successful groups of insects on earth, colonizing all continents except Antarctica. To date, there are some 3,106 species that have been identified.

Termites are usually small, measuring between 0.16 and 0.59 inches long. Due to their appearance, they are often called “white ants,” but they are not ants.

Termites live in colonies, and have a caste system that includes sterile male and female workers, soldiers, kings (fertile males) and one or more fertile females called “queens.” The king and queen reproduce; the soldiers defend the colony; and the workers feed the other members of the colony with substances derived from the digestion of plant material, either from the mouth or anus.

Female termite queens are thought to have the longest lifespan among adult insects 15 to 20 years whereas most tend to live for only a few weeks at most.

Termites are notorious for their ability to eat wood and cause billions of dollars of damage to wooden structures, crops and plantation forests worldwide. However, they do play a necessary role in the environment by recycling in the soil the complex carbohydrate cellulose that is found in the cell walls of dead plants. Most termite species rely on symbiotic protozoa and other microbes in their gut to digest the cellulose that they chew and swallow, allowing them to absorb the end products for their own use.

A few species of termites practice what is called fungiculture. The termites dig tunnels in the wood, then inoculate the tunnels with fungi that grow on the wood. These termites then eat the fungi, not the wood itself.

Termites are eaten by a number of animals, and they are also a delicacy in the diet of some human cultures and are used in many traditional medicines.

Larrie Stone is a retired Dana College science professor.

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Study finds aardvarks suffering as African climate heats up – GuelphToday

Posted: at 9:40 am

JOHANNESBURG Little is known about Africa’s elusive aardvarks, but new research says they are vulnerable to climate change like many other species.

Hotter temperatures are taking their toll on the aardvark, whose diet of ants and termites is becoming scarcer in some areas because of reduced rainfall, according to a study released Monday.

Drought in the Kalahari desert killed five out of six aardvarks that were being monitored for a year, as well as 11 others in the area, said researchers at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg.

The aardvarks’ body temperatures plummeted during the night because they were not getting enough energy from diminished food sources, said physiology professor Andrea Fuller. She said they tried to conserve energy by looking for insects during the warmer daytime, but their efforts to adapt could not save them.

The body temperatures of the ones that died had dropped to as low as 25 degrees Celsius (77 Fahrenheit), compared to a normal temperature of a little below 37 degrees Celsius (98.6 Fahrenheit).

Researchers, who monitored the aardvarks with tiny sensors attached to implanted computer chips, said some birds, reptiles and other animals use aardvark burrows to escape extreme temperatures, reproduce and hide from predators. They could have fewer refuges available if aardvark populations shrink because of rising temperatures, they said.

The aardvark, which lives in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa, is identified as an animal of “least concern” on an international “red list” of threatened species. The list, compiled by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, said there are no indications that the population is changing significantly in southern Africa, though it speculated that numbers may be declining elsewhere because of habitat destruction, the bushmeat trade and other factors.

Estimating aardvark populations is guesswork, Fuller said.

“Very little is known about them because people hardly ever see them,” she said.

___

Follow Christopher Torchia on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/torchiachris

Christopher Torchia, The Associated Press

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A Method in the Madness: How Termites Build and Repair Their Mounds – The Wire

Posted: at 9:40 am

To our surprise we found that termites used all materials as long as they were able to walk and chew on them.

A termite mound. Credit: pompi/pixabay

Bengaluru: Different animals build their homes differently and for varied purposes. Beavers build dams from logs of wood to access food. Woodpeckers drill holes in trees to lay eggs. And termites build mounds to protect themselves against the environment and predators.

Architects in a warming world have been inspired by such structures for the way they regulate temperature on the inside. Psychologists have analysed collective insect behaviour to glean insights about social interactions among humans. And designers have imagined efficient transport systems taking inspiration from birds. But very little is known about how the creatures decide which materials theyd like to build with.

In a recent study, scientists from the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bengaluru, found out how a particular species of termite chooses certain materials to build its mounds with, and how it plans the logistics and the construction itself. The scientists also unearthed some evidence to discover that different members of a termite colony utilise two distinct building blocks to construct a mound. The physical properties of these blocks determines how the mound is erected and over how much time.

Termites are social insects. A termite colony is usually started by a male and a female. They reside in a safe cavern, known as the royal chamber, that lies a couple of feet underground and the female termites only responsibility is to only lay eggs. All other termites in the colony, then, are their offsprings. They are divided into different castes: workers and soldiers, with a clear division of labour between them. Workers carry out all the chores in a colony: collecting food from nearby plant material, taking care of the queens eggs, grooming her, growing a garden of fungus inside the mound and building the mound itself. Soldiers are responsible for defending the colony from intruders, such as predatory ants.

In one species of termites (Odontotermes obesus), which Nikita Zachariah, a doctoral student at IISc, studied, the workers come in two different sizes. The bigger ones were called major workers and the smaller ones, minor. O. obesus is found across India. These termites build castle-shaped buttressed mounds standing five or six feet tall.

Termites build mounds by joining bricks just like we do to build houses, Zachariah explained. The bricks to the bugs are tiny rolled-up balls of soil. Many bricks joined together are called boluses. Termites make them by filling their mouths with moist soil and mixing it with their saliva, which acts as the cement for the mound. Termites carry these boluses, one at a time, and deposit them at the construction site.

Together with her advisor Renee Borges, Zachariah expected the difference in body and head sizes of the major and minor workers and the bricks they made to impact the eventual bolus size. To test this, the researchers, breached the walls of a mound occupied by termites. Whenever the worker termites sense a breach in the mound, they begin to repair it. Taking advantage of this, Zachariah placed needles on the mound wall and collected boluses that the workers deposited atop them while repairing the mound. The duo found that major workers made four-times more boluses than the minor workers by volume, indicating that differences in size determines the load they could carry.

In the natural world, termite workers encounter different kinds of materials. Soil and sand are granular. Root secretions are gummy. The plants leaves are fibrous.

Zachariah said, We wanted to test if different kinds of materials determine how easy the termites found these materials to handle. So she and Borges gave termites more than 20 options. The termites found granular materials red soil, sand, glass beads and crushed hydrogels easier to handle than materials that repelled water or were completely porous, like copper, paraffin wax, tissue paper, intact hydrogels and agar. The bugs also stayed away from materials that absorbed moisture, like salt, because it would dry their bodies up and kill them.

However, the termites didnt particularly prefer one granular option over another. They also couldnt work with smooth steel balls until the surfaces of the orbs were roughened. To our surprise we found that termites used all materials as long as they were able to walk and chew on them, said Zachariah. They did have their personal favourites [but they] loved granular materials over others.

Boluses out of crushed hydrogel were made faster than those with other materials. Between red and burnt soil, termites took almost twice as much time with burnt soil, likely because it is devoid of any organic matter. As a result, fewer burnt-soil boluses made their way into the construction than did red-soil boluses. The termites also preferred materials with some moisture in them as that helped cement the bricks together better. So the amount of time taken to make boluses also has a say in termites preferred choice of material.

When the researchers breached a mound, they also recorded some peculiar behaviour: they found that major and minor workers repaired the breach working in tandem, in a coordinated manner. They think the termites do this by leaving chemical scents for others to follow, a mechanism known as stigmergy. Major workers would first deposit the bigger boluses and then minor workers would place their smaller boluses in between them. Thus, the workers repaired the breach by filling it from the edges and moving towards the centre. The researchers think this allows the mound to be repacked with greater efficiency and enhances its strength and stability.

Sanjay Sane, who works on the physics and neurobiology of insects at the National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bengaluru, told The Wire, This study uses careful experimental approaches to show how termites can build these super-structures. According to him, Zachariah and Borges have improved our understanding of how insects behave, and the new knowledge could cascade into newer inspirations for architecture and civil engineering. Sane was not involved with the study.

All termites need is usable materials, favourable climatic conditions, along with water, to build mounds. This can help predict the geographical distribution of mound-building termites and provide reasons why they will not be found in deserts or marshes.

Vrushal Pendharkar is a writer at IndiaBioScience.

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How Francis Mallmann feeds the rich and famous with food from the fire – Telegraph.co.uk

Posted: July 30, 2017 at 3:46 pm

If Mallmanns food is simple, little else in his life has been. At 13, he left home, later travelling to the US to commune with West Coast hippies. After living off carpentry, termite extermination and seaweed husbandry, he returned to Argentina to open a restaurant. In 1980, he wrote to every three-Michelin-star chef in France begging for stages. After three years of being screamed at in French, he emerged a true believer in haute cuisine. I became an elegant chef, he says, wincing.

At a dinner in Buenos Aires for Cartier, the head of the company approached and said, Ive just had one of the most disgusting meals of my life. The menu is written in French, but really your food is not French at all. Stung, Mallmann began to explore the food of Argentina, and then ditched French cooking altogether. Trading toque for beret and fine dining for the rusticity of Argentine staples, he lit a bonfire under those culinary vanities.

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Rollins, Inc. Enjoys Broad-Based Growth — The Motley Fool – Motley Fool

Posted: at 3:46 pm

Rollins (NYSE:ROL) reported second-quarter financial results on July 26. The parent company of Orkin and other pest-management businesses posted its 45th consecutive quarter of improved revenue and earnings.

Metric

Q2 2017

Q2 2016

Year-Over-Year Change

Revenue

$433.555 million

$411.133 million

5.5%

Net Income

$53.689 million

$47.783 million

12.4%

Earnings per share

$0.25

$0.22

13.6%

Data source: Rollins Q2 2017 earnings press release.

Revenue grew 5.5% year over year to $433.6 million, including 0.6% from acquisitions and 4.9% in organic growth — Rollins’ highest Q2 organic growth in five years.

Rollins saw growth in all of its business lines, including residential pest control (up 5.9%), commercial pest control (up 5.1%), and the termite segment (up 6.1%).

The company continues to expand both domestically and internationally. On July 25, Rollins announced an agreement to acquire Northwest Exterminating Co., Inc. — the 17th-largest pest control operator in the United States with reported revenue of more than $50 million in 2016. Rollins also made moves to grow its non-U.S. business, as explained by CEO Gary Rollins during a conference call with analysts:

During the quarter, we were also pleased to have expanded Orkin’s presence internationally by adding six new franchises in Central America, South America, and Southeast Asia. These franchises are located in Nicaragua; Lima, Peru; Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; and in Jakarta, Indonesia. We now have 76 franchises located around the world, building our Orkin brand.

The Orkin man is in high demand. Image source: Rollins Inc.

Moreover, Rollins is becoming more profitable as it expands. The company’s investments in routing and scheduling technology helped gross margin improve to 52.8%, up from 52.3% in the prior-year quarter. Additionally, sales, general, and administrative expenses as a percent of revenue decreased to 29.9% from 30.8%, mainly due to lower payroll expenses. Together, these improvements helped net income before taxes rise 11.9% to $86.1 million.

All told, net income rose 12.4% to $53.7 million, and earnings per share increased 13.6% to $0.25.

As is typically the case, Rollins declined to offer financial guidance. CFO Eddie Northen did, however, note that the company remains on the hunt for value-creating acquisitions:

A large portion of our cash balance will be used for the Northwest acquisition, but by no means would this limit our ability or appetite to continue to pursue good-quality pest-control and wildlife companies like Northwest as we move forward. As you’re probably aware, we hold $175 million line of credit and a $75 million credit sub facility that we would be willing and ready to use for the right opportunity.

Northen went on to note that privately owned businesses in the U.S. and — increasingly — international markets would remain an attractive hunting ground for further deals:

For many years Rollins has been considered the acquirer of choice for many family-owned companies. We feel that we are in a great position to continue to deploy capital to get the best return for our shareholders.

Joe Tenebruso has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Rollins. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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What You Should Know About Termite Fumigation | Enlighten Me

Posted: at 3:46 pm

Termite fumigation is not something the average homeowner will want to attempt. Fumigation is a process where termites are eliminated from a structure by using a lethal gas. Gas is effective in reaching the inaccessible places where termites live in a home. However, because it is a toxic gas, you will want to call in a pest control professional to handle the job. Here are the pros and cons about termite fumigation.

It is thorough. Spot treatments will kill some termites, but there are spaces between the interior and exterior of your home that spot treatments cant reach. A fumigation treatment will reach every area of your home, and will not miss any termites.

It will help save your home. A termite infestation can do serious structural damage to your home. Termite fumigation is worth the expense because it can save you money by eliminating the cause of long term damage to your home.

It is expensive. Termite fumigation is a much more comprehensive treatment than other methods. It involves more time, effort, and materials, and this can be costly. Still, you have to balance the cost of treatment versus the cost of repairing termite damage to your house if you use methods that dont kill all the termites.

It is time consuming. Termite fumigation isnt something that can be done in an afternoon. There are a number of steps in the process. First, people, pets, and plants must be removed from the house. In addition, food, medicines, mattresses, box springs, and pillows should be removed or placed in a special fume-bag that can be provided by the fumigator. You also need to trim plants near the exterior of the home so that the fumigators can move freely near the walls. That area should be watered to prevent the fumigant from being absorbed by the soil and killing your exterior plants. In some cases, items such as antennas, satellite dishes, weather vanes, and even fencing may need to be taken down so that the fumigators can completely cover the house with tarps.

Termite fumigation can last from 24 to 48 hours, and even then the process is not over. When enough time has passed for the gas to do its job, the fumigator will use a fan to aerate the home for another six to eight hours. After this, the fumigator must certify that the home is ready to be occupied again.

There are safety issues. Termite fumigation involves use of a toxic gas, and safety measures have to be taken. Professional termite fumigators will take precautions to keep you safe, but you could still experience side effects, such as headaches, nausea, coughing, or tearing. If these occur, you need to leave the house at once and contact a physician, as well as the termite fumigation company.

Termite fumigation is a serious treatment for a serious problem. If you are at the point where you are considering this treatment option, you should definitely call in a pest control professional.

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