NYC Termite Pest Control Extermination Operators, Inspection, Fumigation and Treatment


Page 339«..1020..338339340341..350..»

Termite-Sniffing Pooch Assists Local Exterminator

Posted: May 5, 2012 at 2:10 am

By Steve Shaw, News 9

OKLAHOMA CITY — One of the mildest winters on record means termites are already a problem in Oklahoma.

Phillip Culp says he’s found a much more effective way of finding termites than exterminators normally do. A few years ago, he bought a long-haired Jack Russell Terrier named Daisy.

Daisy came from a Texas company that trains dogs.

Culp says dogs’ keen sense of smell allows them to detect the methane gas smell termites emit.He says Daisy is 90 to 95 percent accurate, whereas people are 27 to 47 percent accurate in detecting termites. And Culp says Daisy only works for food.

“I give her sometimes chicken, sometimes hotdogs, whatever works for that day. Kind of like me, she works for cheap,” Culp said.

The best thing about Daisy and all the other dogs that Texas organization trains is that they rescue all their dogs from the pound.

Daisy isn’t the only termite-hunting dog on Culp’s staff. He also has a 3-year-old border collie named Zema who is just learning the ropes as well.

Visit link:
Termite-Sniffing Pooch Assists Local Exterminator

Posted in Termites | Comments Off on Termite-Sniffing Pooch Assists Local Exterminator

Termites swarm the Lake area

Posted: at 2:10 am

LAKE CHARLES, LA (KPLC) –

Springtime and early summer bring in swarms of termites to the Lake Charles and surrounding areas.

Local exterminators, like J&J Exterminating, received hundreds of calls on Wednesday, May 2 after swarms of termites the night before had the community buzzing.

“We’re just kind of toward the end of the native swarm and the Formosan swarm is just now kicking off and it looks like it’s going to be a pretty good one,” Robert Soileau Manager for the J&J Exterminating branch in Lake Charles said.

Soileau said there are two different types of termites in the Calcasieu Parish area: the native subterranean and the Formosan.

“The Formosan [come out] right at dusk normally and they’ll get swarming,” Soileau said. “And they’re attracted to light so a lot of people will notice them more than the natives which swarm during the day.”

Since the Formosan swarm at night, they’re attracted to light and light coming from inside a home attracts the termites to the home where they’ll try to find their way in.

“Their inside the wood or the ground and the tubes that they build to get into the structure,” Soileau said.

The termites can enter the home through vents, plumbing, bathtubs, underneath cracks in the door and windows, even the attic.

Soileau said the swarmers themselves don’t do the damage. Their only reason for being is to find a mate and start a new colony. It’s the workers in the colony that do the most damage.

Original post:
Termites swarm the Lake area

Posted in Termites | Comments Off on Termites swarm the Lake area

Video Friday: Robot Termites, Dust Puppies, and Serious Social Issues

Posted: at 2:10 am

Phew, we made it to another Video Friday! That “phew” is because it’s been a busy few weeks in the world of robots, and we’ve still got ICRA to look forward to in Minnesota starting in just 10 days followed directly by both ROSCon and Maker Faire.

If there have been just too many robotics events for you to keep up with, we feel your pain, and we’ve started up a Google Calendar to try and keep track of everything. We’ve literally just started it, but you can subscribe to it (the link is in the column over on the right) and as we add events, they’ll show up. Shoot us an email if you’ve got an event you’d like us to stick on there, too.

Meanwhile, on with the videos! Huzzah!

There was no way we were risking our fancy new GoPro camera on anything much deadlier than micro-rockets, but Matt Maxham stuck one on his 220-pound combat robot, Sewer Snake. Predictably, violence ensues, but you’ve never seen it from a perspective like this before.

Aila is certainly one of the, uh, curviest robots we’ve ever seen, and she’s learning how to learn how to grasp things from human demonstrations using a motion capture glove. For example, she can now pick shoes up out of a box, which would be useful except that Aila doesn’t have any feet. Oh well.

[ Aila ]

Read this article:
Video Friday: Robot Termites, Dust Puppies, and Serious Social Issues

Posted in Termites | Comments Off on Video Friday: Robot Termites, Dust Puppies, and Serious Social Issues

Termites swarm through south Mississippi

Posted: May 1, 2012 at 3:10 pm

BILOXI, MS (WLOX) –

Pest Control Specialists say termite season has come a little early this year. That means homeowners need to get a head start in making sure they’re prepared for the crawlers.

Experts say each year the bugs are responsible forfive billiondollars worth of damage to homes in the country. That’s why homeowners are racing to fix the problem.

Lately the folks at Redd Pest Solutions have been getting tons of calls. “It started two nights ago and it will continue for the next few days. People have been calling into our office, very distraught over the fact that they’re seeing termites come into their house,” pest control specialistMatt Stone said.

There’s good reason for the panic. Over the past few days there’s been an influx in Formosan termite swarmers. Aside from the fact that their arrival is about two weeks early. These little guys can do some serious damage.

“They can eat a wall up in a house in a matter offour tofive days, very destructive. You have to treat the colony. The colony is usually coming from the ground up. You have to treat where they’re coming up from the home with a good termitacide,” Stone said.

Stone says he urges homeowners take care of the problem while they still can. If an infestation is ignored, it could result in thousands of dollars worth of damage to your home and a major headache to top it all off. The good, is that there’s still hope.

“This is not out of the usual as far as them swarming. What’s unusual it that they’re a little early and the numbers are a little bit greater than normal. With our company, we’ll get to them as soon as we can. We’re getting so many calls right now because of the swarm. But we’ll get you in line and get it taken care of as soon as possible,” Stone said.

Copyright 2012 WLOX. All rights reserved.

Read the original here:
Termites swarm through south Mississippi

Posted in Termites | Comments Off on Termites swarm through south Mississippi

Experts warn of damages termites can cause

Posted: at 3:10 pm

NASHVILLE, Tenn. –

As the warm, spring temperatures continue, experts recommend some tips to help keep your home free of termites.

According to experts, the Mid-State is the prime habitat for the critters.

“It is never a question of whether or not you will get termites, but when is more the case. They are a persistent force of nature here,” explained Tennessee Department of Agriculture Pesticide Inspector Phil Hurst.

Hurst said termites, like any other creature, is just trying to survive.

“Survival sometimes, unfortunately, means destruction of our structures or at least they are feeding on it,” he said.

Hurst told Nashville’s News 2 termites primarily live underground, so swings in temperatures have little affect on the pests.

“I wouldn’t say the termite situation is going to be any worse than any other year, but it certainly accelerated it with the short or non-existent winter that we had,” he explained.

As the temperatures rise in early spring the termites will take to the air in a swarm. Hundreds of termites fly away in an attempt to find mates and start new colonies.

Due to the swarm behavior, Hurst recommends having your home inspected regularly for signs of termite infestations.

Originally posted here:
Experts warn of damages termites can cause

Posted in Termites | Comments Off on Experts warn of damages termites can cause

Termite Activity Jumps Due to Early Spring Weather

Posted: April 27, 2012 at 2:10 am

PARSIPPANY, N.J., April 26, 2012 /PRNewswire/ –Western Pest Services, a New Jersey-based pest control company with branches throughout the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast regions, has noticed an increase in residents reporting termite activity throughout its service area during the first quarter of 2012. Rollins, Inc. (ROL), parent company for Western Pest Services, has seen a 15 percent increase in termite treatment sales across all brands.

“Early spring-like temperatures have brought pests out sooner than usual including flying insects, ants and termites,” said Phil Pierce, entomologist and technical services manager for Western Pest Services. “While it is easy to spot flying insects and ants, termite activity can go unnoticed by homeowners until they start seeing swarmers, which can resemble flying ants. Although termite swarms typically occur in April for much of the northern part of the U.S., we began seeing termite swarms as early as January, which is extremely unusual.”

The following cities are ranked in order by the number of termite inquiries received, as identified by Western Pest Services, between January and March of 2012 compared to January through March of 2011:

“While termites are most active when temperatures are above 60 degrees, it is important to note that they pose a year-round threat and not all colonies produce swarmers,” added Pierce. “An average yard surrounding a home can support three, four or even more colonies, which can vary in size from thousands to tens of thousands of termites.”

Known as the silent destroyers, termites can be very difficult to detect. They usually live entirely out of sight, silently feeding on cellulose from wood or wood products. Often, the only sign of termites is when swarmers, or winged adults, emerge from an existing colony that has reached a certain size to reproduce and start new colonies. While spotting swarmers or their discarded wings signals the presence of termites, it may also indicate that the colony has been active for several years.

In addition to being a difficult pest to spot, the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) reports that termites are the most destructive pest to the home in the U.S.

“Property damage from termites costs homeowners approximately $5 billion every year,” said Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs for NPMA. “When termite activity is not detected early, an infestation can spiral out of control very quickly. As a result, homeowners should be on full alert this spring.”

While homeowners should be aware of any termite activity around the home, they can work to limit risks of future termite infestations.

“Termites, like all pests, seek out three key elements for survival food, water and shelter,” said Pierce. “While restricting access to water and cellulose-based materials can help deter termites, these resilient pests have been around for 250 million years. Therefore, it is important that homeowners schedule yearly termite inspections with a pest management professional to help manage any issues that may be present.”

Pierce also recommends that homeowners take several proactive steps to help decrease the chances of termite problems:

Original post:
Termite Activity Jumps Due to Early Spring Weather

Posted in Termites | Comments Off on Termite Activity Jumps Due to Early Spring Weather

Kinston family’s living room floor collapses

Posted: April 13, 2012 at 10:10 am

A Kinston family is searching for a temporary home this week after a swarm of termites reportedly caused the living room floor to cave at their rental house in what could be the first sign of a busy pest season.

Thomas Knight may have to move into an apartment after termites apparently weakened the living room floorboard of the house his family has rented at 407 E. Lenoir Ave. for the past three years, said his landlord Jasper S. Kirkman Sr.

The state of the move hinges on Greg Dempsey, Kinstons senior building inspector, who planned to visit the home this morning to see if it met the citys minimal housing standard.

Usually, if the floor is collapsed or there is a major structural failure, we typically end up condemning the building for being unsafe, which looks to be the case here, Dempsey said.

If condemned, the city would issue a deadline-imposed notice of repair on the home, documenting what needs to be fixed before Kirkman can rent it out again.

Attempts by The Free Press to reach the family by phone and in person were unsuccessful. A neighbor said one of the tenants is bedridden.

Donna Kennedy, of the City of Kinstons Inspection Department, said the family called the citys inspection department Wednesday morning to request their home be examined after the floor of their living room suddenly caved in while Knight walked his daughter to the front door.

Kirkman, 88, called the event a first in his 40-plus years as a landlord and said termites are likely to blame.

Ive never seen that happen before in my life, Kirkman said. The living room floor just sank down in the center.

Kirkman said no injuries were reported and that he planned to get a contractor to assess the home to determine if it can be fixed.

See the article here:
Kinston family’s living room floor collapses

Posted in Termites | Comments Off on Kinston family’s living room floor collapses

Warm weather brings bugs ahead of schedule

Posted: March 30, 2012 at 3:16 am

Subterranean termites are among the pests making an early appearance this year.

Ticks, termites, fleas and mosquitoes are part of a torrent of insects emerging early, after a mild winter and the abrupt arrival of summer-like weather. Exterminators are taking calls for pest infestations a month earlier than usual. Sarasota and Manatee counties already are treating ditches to keep mosquito populations at bay. “We’ve had a lot more calls earlier in the year than we’re used to,” said Danny Nix, manager of Hughes Exterminators in Sarasota. Fleas, ticks, ants and termite swarms have become the biggest problems. Since early March, daytime highs have regularly climbed into the mid- to upper-80s, about 10 degrees above normal. Temperatures rose high enough to match or break records six times so far this year. Similar abnormally warm weather covered most of the nation through last week, though the northeast is bracing for cold weather and even potential snow in the next few days. In Michigan, for example, temperatures soared more than 30 degrees above normal last week. The early warmth triggers changes in nature. Flowers bloom earlier and bugs jump into action faster. “One cannot deny that the insects are appearing at an earlier time and in bigger numbers,” said Gary Hevel, a research collaborator with the Department of Entomology at the Smithsonian Institution, in Washington, D.C. Hevel said it is not just pests that respond to the warmth. Various flies and honeybees also are active earlier, in response to early flower blossoms. Fred Santana, an entomologist who recently retired from Sarasota County, has been watching the changes from his own backyard. Ghost ants and white-footed ants invaded his home early and lots of pollinators, such as sweat bees, are buzzing around his flowers. “The warmer temperatures so few of them get killed off. The soil doesn’t get cold enough to really harm them and they just keep right on foraging,” Santana said. That is what happened with the fleas and ticks, Nix said. The blood-suckers never took a rest because the weather did not get cold enough to slow them down. “When it stays warm they can get larger in the size of their colonies. There’s nothing to push them back,” he said. Calls for fleas and ticks are up 20 percent now compared with a year ago, Nix said. Two houses in downtown Sarasota had tick infestations so bad that Nix collected two full cups of the tiny pests. The residents of both homes spent a lot of time outdoors in the woods, where ticks are more commonly found. Mosquitoes also are emerging earlier. Chris Lesser, assistant director of the Manatee County Mosquito Control District, said residents and visitors are calling mosquito control for service about two months earlier than normal. Dry weather helped to keep mosquito populations under control earlier in the year. But recent rain means the dormant larvae will soon hatch, said Eric Schreiber, manager of mosquito management services for Sarasota County. After nearly an inch of rain fell recently in the North Port area, crews quickly treated the flooded ditches. “If it’s really nice and hot, their development time is really fast,” Schreiber said. To prevent mosquitoes, people need to remove all sources of standing water from their yards. For termites, keeping a tightly sealed home is key to preventing their entry. It is also important to keep mulch, twigs and leaves at least 15 inches away from the house to prevent subterranean termites and other pests from entering.

Ticks, termites, fleas and mosquitoes are part of a torrent of insects emerging early, after a mild winter and the abrupt arrival of summer-like weather. Exterminators are taking calls for pest infestations a month earlier than usual. Sarasota and Manatee counties already are treating ditches to keep mosquito populations at bay. “We’ve had a lot more calls earlier in the year than we’re used to,” said Danny Nix, manager of Hughes Exterminators in Sarasota. Fleas, ticks, ants and termite swarms have become the biggest problems. Since early March, daytime highs have regularly climbed into the mid- to upper-80s, about 10 degrees above normal. Temperatures rose high enough to match or break records six times so far this year. Similar abnormally warm weather covered most of the nation through last week, though the northeast is bracing for cold weather and even potential snow in the next few days. In Michigan, for example, temperatures soared more than 30 degrees above normal last week. The early warmth triggers changes in nature. Flowers bloom earlier and bugs jump into action faster. “One cannot deny that the insects are appearing at an earlier time and in bigger numbers,” said Gary Hevel, a research collaborator with the Department of Entomology at the Smithsonian Institution, in Washington, D.C. Hevel said it is not just pests that respond to the warmth. Various flies and honeybees also are active earlier, in response to early flower blossoms. Fred Santana, an entomologist who recently retired from Sarasota County, has been watching the changes from his own backyard. Ghost ants and white-footed ants invaded his home early and lots of pollinators, such as sweat bees, are buzzing around his flowers. “The warmer temperatures so few of them get killed off. The soil doesn’t get cold enough to really harm them and they just keep right on foraging,” Santana said. That is what happened with the fleas and ticks, Nix said. The blood-suckers never took a rest because the weather did not get cold enough to slow them down. “When it stays warm they can get larger in the size of their colonies. There’s nothing to push them back,” he said. Calls for fleas and ticks are up 20 percent now compared with a year ago, Nix said. Two houses in downtown Sarasota had tick infestations so bad that Nix collected two full cups of the tiny pests. The residents of both homes spent a lot of time outdoors in the woods, where ticks are more commonly found. Mosquitoes also are emerging earlier. Chris Lesser, assistant director of the Manatee County Mosquito Control District, said residents and visitors are calling mosquito control for service about two months earlier than normal. Dry weather helped to keep mosquito populations under control earlier in the year. But recent rain means the dormant larvae will soon hatch, said Eric Schreiber, manager of mosquito management services for Sarasota County. After nearly an inch of rain fell recently in the North Port area, crews quickly treated the flooded ditches. “If it’s really nice and hot, their development time is really fast,” Schreiber said. To prevent mosquitoes, people need to remove all sources of standing water from their yards. For termites, keeping a tightly sealed home is key to preventing their entry. It is also important to keep mulch, twigs and leaves at least 15 inches away from the house to prevent subterranean termites and other pests from entering.

View post:
Warm weather brings bugs ahead of schedule

Posted in Termites | Comments Off on Warm weather brings bugs ahead of schedule

Termite Inspection: Will Yours Be One of the 1 in 30 Homes(i) Under Attack This Year?

Posted: March 29, 2012 at 8:13 pm

Quotes delayed, except where indicated otherwise. Delay times are 15 mins for NASDAQ, NYSE and Amex. See also delay times for other exchanges. Quotes and other information supplied by independent providers identified on the Yahoo! Finance partner page. Quotes are updated automatically, but will be turned off after 25 minutes of inactivity. Quotes are delayed at least 15 minutes. All information provided “as is” for informational purposes only, not intended for trading purposes or advice. Neither Yahoo! nor any of independent providers is liable for any informational errors, incompleteness, or delays, or for any actions taken in reliance on information contained herein. By accessing the Yahoo! site, you agree not to redistribute the information found therein.

Fundamental company data provided by Capital IQ. Historical chart data and daily updates provided by Commodity Systems, Inc. (CSI). International historical chart data and daily updates provided by Morningstar, Inc.

Yahoo! – ABC News Network

Read more from the original source:
Termite Inspection: Will Yours Be One of the 1 in 30 Homes(i) Under Attack This Year?

Posted in Termites | Comments Off on Termite Inspection: Will Yours Be One of the 1 in 30 Homes(i) Under Attack This Year?

Spring swarming season will let you know if you have termites

Posted: March 26, 2012 at 10:38 pm

Termites are just as happy with the warm weather and drought-busting rains as practically everyone else in Southeast Texas.

“Typically, when temperatures get up close to the 80 degree mark or above, a warm rain shower will trigger a termite colony to swarm,” said Barry Bryant of Bill Clark Pest Control.

The insect pests tend to be active between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., a time when many people are at work or school.

Helpful hint: You have termites if you come home to find piles of dead insects lying around.

Subterranean termites are black insects with wings, often mistaken for flying ants.

“It’s not pleasant to see,” Bryant said of termite swarms.

Swarming is the singles bar scene of the termite mating ritual.

The insects leave their colonies in search of open air, but in their search for the highest point to exit, might make their way up through the walls of the homes they feast on. Then, they exit into rooms through gaps or crevasses in walls or paneling, said David Kibodeaux, a Terminix entomologist.

Termites can be actively gnawing away on homes year round without residents knowing about it until they swarm.

“I think of it as an alarm system,” he said. “It gets a lot of people aware they have a problem.”

Read more:
Spring swarming season will let you know if you have termites

Posted in Termites | Comments Off on Spring swarming season will let you know if you have termites

Page 339«..1020..338339340341..350..»