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How Much Does It Cost To Get Rid Of Termites?

Posted: September 16, 2018 at 10:46 am

Home > Home Improvement > Testing and/or Removal Services > Get Rid Of Termites

Termites cause billions of dollars in damage each year. If you suspect that the wood-eating insects have infested your residence, contacting a pest control expert right away is highly recommended. An inspection will uncover whether or not you have a termite problem and if so, how the insects should be dealt with. The cost of termite extermination depends on the termite species, the structure size, and the pest control method(s) used.

A resident termite population is not a problem to take lightly. Here’s what you should know about identifying the pests, treating them, and protecting your property moving forward.

Telltale signs of termites include mud tubes, feeding damage, and swarms of winged termites, especially indoors. “Swarmers” are typically discovered during the spring (March-May), the time of year when termites disperse and begin new colonies. But in the case of subterranean and drywood termites, the homeowner may never have a clue there’s a problem. If you are able to spot (or better yet, capture) a bug, the U.S. Department of Agriculture provides this termite identification guide.

The species of termite largely determines the treatment method. Exterminating subterranean termites (which live below the ground), for example, involves treating the soil around and under the home by means of drilling and injecting liquid termiticide. This tactic, however, wouldn’t work on other types of termites, which might need to be treated with other methods, including:

Learn more about these termite extermination methods from Virginia Tech and the University of California.

Whether you want to avoid termites in the first place or keep them from coming back, there are a number of steps homeowner can take to keep termites away. Water control is key; make sure that you have a properly functioning gutter and downspout system and that there isn’t excessive humidity in the basement/crawlspace. Also avoid storing lumber, mulch, or wood near or around the foundation and trim back shrubs and trees away from the house. The Ohio State University provides this guide for reducing the risk of termite infestation.

The potentially high cost of termite damage, combined with the visceral reaction people have in response to bug infestations, make homeowners vulnerable to unscrupulous pest control companies. Before signing a work order, make sure that the company is state licensed and a member of the National Pest Management Association (and/or a state pest control association).

A service agreement contract that renews annually (upon payment) and typically includes a once-per-year inspection as well as follow-up treatments as needed will probably be offered. Some homeowners complain that the yearly inspection is nothing more than a cursory walkthrough while others enjoy the added protection and peace of mind.

If you do sign a contract, make sure you understand what’s covered. In particular, be clear on the frequency of inspections (once per year, quarterly, etc.) and whether the contract includes repairs (from termite damage) or just retreatment.

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How Much Does It Cost To Get Rid Of Termites?

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Action – Affordable Pest Control in New Jersey

Posted: September 7, 2018 at 7:40 pm

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Termites – Biology and Control – Browse Popular Publications

Posted: September 6, 2018 at 7:41 am

Termites are the most important wood-destroying structural pests in the southern United States. According to some estimates, over $2 billion are spent annually in the United States controlling or preventing termite infestations. In North Carolina, our main problem is with subterranean termites, i.e., termites that normally live below ground and may move up into a structure where they cause damage. Termites are “social insects,” i.e., they live in a nest or colony which is typically found underground, often near a tree, stump, wood pile or other source of ‘food.’ Each colony contains a king and queen who are brown in color. They are wingless now but started out having wings and “swarming” from their original home or nesting site where they developed. The queen is able to lay thousands of eggs each year. and continues to do so for about five years. There are also soldier termites which have large heads equipped with large mandibles (“jaws”). The soldiers protect the colony from invaders (such as ants). The bulk of the termite colony consists of thousands of whitish workers who serve various roles. Some workers maintain the nesting site and take care of the queen and the newly hatching immatures (sometimes called “larvae”). Other workers go out and actively forage (search) for food. The foraging workers are the ones that we typically find infesting wood. As the colony grows, the workers expand both the nest and their feeding area. Depending on the species of termite, a mature colony can contain 200,000 to 2,000,000 workers, although many colonies contain as few as 50,000-60,000. Studies have also shown that termites from a single colony may forage across an area of one-third acre and travel over 200 feet from their nest. One acre of land may support several termite colonies (although this doesn’t mean that all of them are invading your home!). A large termite colony does not usually occupy a single underground nest. As the foraging area expands the colony actually splits to form several smaller “nesting sites.”

Eastern subterranean termite soldier.

Gary Alpert, Harvard University, Bugwood.org

Gary Alpert, Harvard University, Bugwood.org

Subterranean termite workers.

Clemson University – USDA Cooperative Extension Slide Series, Bugwood.org

Clemson University – USDA Cooperative Extension Slide Series, Bugwood.org

Without a periodic inspection of your home, termite activity can remain undetected for years. Some signs of their activity show up unexpectedly, while others are discovered by accident or during renovations. Here are some key signs of a termite infestation:

Swarming – A termite colony can mature in 3-5 years and begin to produce swarmers (winged adults). In North Carolina, we have at least three native species of subterranean termites that begin swarming in late winter and continue into September or October. Swarming usually occurs during the day, particularly on warm days following rain. Swarmers found outdoors near tree stumps, landscape timbers, etc., are not an indication that your house is infested, but they serve as a reminder that termites live around us. When swarming occurs indoors, it usually means that you have an infestation somewhere within your house. Several species of ants also swarm at the same times of the year as termites. Winged termites and ants look somewhat similar, but you can tell them apart by certain features. If you’re not sure whether you have termites or ants, show them to a pest management professional or bring specimens to your county Cooperative Extension Center for identification.

Mud tubesUnlike ants, termites do not roam around on the soil surface or out in the open. They will either tunnel through the soil or into wood (or other material) or else travel inside pencil-size (or larger) “mud tubes” that they build from soil, wood particles and other materials. You will find these tubes on foundation walls, floor joists or other parts of the house. Tubes may also hang from the floor system (see picture below) or may be found protruding from cracks between boards and beams and even through holes termites may chew through sheet rock on walls and ceilings. Break open the tubes to see if termites are still active. An empty tube doesn’t necessarily mean that termites are gone; they may have simply abandoned this particular tunnel. Termites often rebuild damaged tubes, which is another indication of current activity. ‘Old’ tubes are dry and crumble easily, leaving behind “etching” on the surface that may be visible for years (an indication that a house had termite activity at some time). Without knowing the inspection history of the house, it is impossible to tell or guess at the age of tunnels or etching.

Tubes that are found on ceilings or on upper levels of a building may indicate that you have an aboveground (“aerial”) infestation, i.e., the termite colony actually lives in the building and the termites are traveling up from the soil. Mud tubes built by an aboveground colony usually contain materials other than soil, e.g., wood and sheet rock or whatever the termites are feeding on. These secondary infestations occur when there is a serious moisture problem or leak somewhere within the structure. In such situations, a thorough inspection may require removal of siding or interior wallboards, etc. More importantly for you, these aboveground infestations cannot be controlled with the usual soil treatment (see below) and are typically excluded from a termite contract warranty. In these situations, finding and correcting the moisture problem is the first step to eliminating the termites.

Termite mud tubes on crawlspace pier.

Michael Waldvogel – NCSU – Entomology

Termite tube on attic joist.

Michael Waldvogel – NCSU – Entomology

Termite mud tubes on exterior foundation wall.

Michael Waldvogel – NCSU – Entomology

We tend to think of termites as feeding/injuring wood only. Termites actually feed on almost anything that contains cellulose, the main component of wood, including wood paneling, paper products, cardboard boxes, art canvases, the paper covering of sheet rock, carpeting, etc. While foraging and feeding, they may tunnel through non-cellulosic materials, such as plastic and foamboard. According to some research, a colony containing 60,000 workers could consume the equivalent of one foot of a 2″ x 4″ piece of lumber in slightly over 5 months. In reality, the amount of damage that termites cause depends on many factors. In areas with cold winter temperatures, termite activity (and feeding) often declines, but does not necessarily stop. If the termites are well-protected from colder temperatures (e.g., underneath a slab), then activity may continue year-round. From a practical perspective, serious termite damage usually takes about 3-8 years.

Look for these signs of termite feeding:

There is no accurate method for determining the age of recently discovered damage. You need some reference point, i.e., some point in time when it was known that there was no damage to this particular wood. This is one reason why annual inspections (and keeping your records of these inspections) are important.

NOTE: These inspections are not a guarantee that you do not have termites or damage in areas that are not covered or not easily seen, such as inside walls. However, the inspections can reveal conditions that might suggest that damage does exist and further investigation is needed.

Termite damage to floor joist and subfloor.

Michael Waldvogel – NCSU – Entomology

Termite damage to wall paneling.

Michael Waldvogel – NCSU – Entomology

What should you do if you think or discover that your home is infested with termites?

If you have a termite protection contract, contact the pest control company immediately and arrange for them to check out the problem. If you do not have a termite contract, call 2-3 (or more) companies and have each one inspect your home and provide you with the details of their findings and any recommendations for a course of action to correct any termite problems that they found. Take your time to evaluate their proposals and determine your best course of action. Termites do not cause significant damage in a short period of time, so spending a few extra days or even a few weeks will not make any real difference in terms how much damage occurs.

There are several important questions you need to ask:

You can find additional information in the publication Tips on Selecting Pest Control Services.

Inspecting a crawlspace for termites.

Michael Waldvogel – NCSU – Entomology

Simply spraying swarmers or the surface of accessible infested wood may kill the termites that you see now, but it does not stop the infestation nor does it protect your house from future attacks by termites. The most common type of termite treatment involves a “trench and treat” where a liquid insecticide (“termiticide”) is applied to the soil surrounding critical areas of your house. The most critical area needing treatment is the foundation wall (see the image to the right). The soil is trenched 6″ deep and about 4-6″ wide. For houses with crawlspaces, the soil along the interior foundation wall must be treated at least within 4 feet of identified signs of termite activity. In some cases, the soil around supports (such as piers) underneath the house are also treated. In order to be effective, this treatment must extend down through the soil to the top of the foundation footer. When applied correctly, this treatment forms a continuous chemical barrier that should prevent termites from reaching the foundation and piers in your house.

Current North Carolina regulations also require drilling and treating of:

You can view the state regulations or obtain a copy from the North Carolina Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services – Structural Pest Control and Pesticides Division (NCDA&CS) in Raleigh (919-733-6100). These specifications are the current minimum requirements for a treatment under state regulations. Some pest control companies still drill and treat the entire foundation wall and piers. Some companies offer “spot treatments”, i.e., they treat only the area(s) of the house where termites are found. A spot treatment may seem like a good idea because it costs less than a full treatment. However, there are some important points to remember. First, a spot treatment may not correct the problem. Second, except when done under an existing contract, a spot treatment often carries a very limited guarantee (or no guarantee at all). It’s your house, your money, your choice. Don’t let economics be your only determining point about how to protect your house from termites. On a new contract (treatment), any treatment procedures that will not be done according to NC regulations must be noted on an official Waiver of Minimum Standards form. You must sign this form as part of your contract. If you are asked to sign a waiver form make sure you understand what each waived item means (i.e., what work is not being done and why it is not being done).

Termite Baits – Another option for treatment is the use of a termite bait. These products are used differently from liquid treatments and may be used with a liquid treatment. See Termites – Baiting Systems for more information about termite baits.

Regardless of whether you have a liquid termite treatment or a baiting system installed, remember this important point: Before you sign a service agreement or contract, read it carefully. Here are some questions to help you evaluate the proposed service:

A list of commonly-used termiticides can be found in the current edition of the North Carolina Agricultural Chemicals Manual. You can also contact NCDA&CS for a complete list of all currently registered termiticides.

Why not “do-it-yourself”?

Although there are termiticides available for homeowner use, we do not recommend the “Do-it-Yourself” (DIY) approach for chemical control of termites for several reasons. Many products have instructions for spraying the surface of infested wood. Simply spraying swarmers or the surface of accessible infested wood kills the termites that you see at that time, but it does not protect the interior parts of that infested wood nor does it protect your house from further termite attacks. If you see termites in one area, don’t assume that it’s the only infested area or that what you see is the extent of the problem in that area. Only a thorough inspection can show if the termites are also feeding someplace else and even then, termites could be infesting your home in areas that are inaccessible (and uninspectable. Also, simply spraying the soil surface and/or exterior foundation wall is not going to stop a termite infestation below ground and possibly entering your home from below ground.

What is needed to do a liquid termite treatment correctly?

There are several products including a termite bait, sprayable foam, and a granular insecticide available for consumer use. READ THE LABELS ON THESE PRODUCTS THOROUGHLY AND CAREFULLY BEFORE PURCHASING AND/OR USING THEM. The product labels all contain a statement to the effect that the use of these products is NOT a substitute for mechanical alteration, soil and foundation treatment, but merely a supplement. In other words, these products will kill termites but they will not eliminate an active termite infestation in your home nor will they product your house from future termite infestations.

Difficult or problem situations

There are situations where a conventional termite treatment is particularly difficult, undesirable, or even impossible. Some situations call require special handling, others may require alternative approaches. For example:

Wood TreatmentsAlthough local or “spot” wood treatments stop termite activity in the treated area, they are not complete termite treatments and they will not stop termites from attacking wood in other areas. One treatment option uses the chemical disodium octaborate tetrahydrate (DOT). This borax-derived chemical is applied to critical wooden structural components in the crawlspace and parts of the framing in a house under construction. Data provided by product manufacturers suggest that termites will not build their tubes over treated wood nor do they cause any structural damage to treated wood. However, depending on the type of construction involved, it may be possible for termites to bypass this treatment and attack nearby untreated wood such as baseboard molding, trim, etc. Chemicals that are suitable for wood treatments are listed in the current edition of the North Carolina Agricultural Chemicals Manual.

FumigationIn North Carolina, structural fumigation (sometimes called “tenting”) is rarely used for our common subterranean termites. Most residential fumigations are performed for drywood termites, which are relatively uncommon in North Carolina, or for wood-boring beetles particularly in log homes.

Foundation footer of a house under construction.

Michael Waldvogel – NCSU – Entomology

A well too close to the house may affect your method of treating for termites.

Michael Waldvogel – NCSU – Entomology

In most cases, the termite treatment on your house includes a one-year termite protection warranty from the pest control company. After one year, you must decide if you want to continue your contract. The cost of a renewal for a house that was treated with a liquid termiticide is typically between $85-$200, depending on the size and construction type of the house and perhaps the type of guarantee (explained below). The most frequently asked question is “Do I really need the annual contract?” Essentially, this is a matter of personal choice, i.e., how much “peace of mind” do you want in terms of protecting your home from termites. Remember: termites are always around us and always looking for “food” (wood). That fact alone does not mean that they are constantly attacking your house. It simply means that there is always some chance that termites might find their way unseen into your house.

The US Environmental Protection Agency requires that termiticide manufacturers prove that their chemicals can remain effective in the soil for at least five years. In most situations, these chemicals usually last longer when applied properly. However, this 5-year requirement is not a guarantee that termites cannot (or will not) invade your house within a five year period. Many factors can affect a termite treatment, such as the way that you maintain your home or if you disturb the treated soil during renovations or landscaping activities. These kinds of situations can provide termites with opportunities to invade the house.

Annual termite contracts are somewhat like medical insurance policies. You are paying to protect your home against the possibility of termite attack. An annual contract can be an effective way of preventing termites from causing significant damage over the years. Likewise, this 5-year requirement by the EPA does not mean that the chemical is totally ineffective after 5 years. This last point will be addressed down below under “Booster Treatments”. It’s important to understand that an annual contract does not mean that the pest control company re-treats your house every year. Unless there is some evidence of termite activity in the house, annual treatments are actually illegal under most termiticide labels (and therefore illegal under both state and federal law). With a termite protection contract, the pest control company inspects (or should inspect) your house for termites annually. If they find evidence of termite activity or if you find evidence of termite activity, then the company takes some appropriate measures, usually a local or ‘spot’ treatment of the infested area. You should not have to pay for any additional treatment to correct a termite problem; that cost is covered by your annual fee. In return, the company expects you to do your part in maintaining your house in a condition that does not increase likelihood of termite problems. For example, routine home maintenance helps prevents moisture problems or other conditions that are conducive to termite activity in the area, i.e., if termites find such area, they are more likely to remain active or expand their activity in that area. Make sure that the termite inspector explains any problem areas that he/she finds during the inspections so that you can correct these problems as soon as possible. In some cases, your failure to correct reported problems may void your termite protection contract. If you’re not home when the house is inspected, the inspector should leave some sort of notice or report about his/her findings. If you’re not clear on the results, call the company’s office and ask them to explain if anything important was found.

Does my contract coverage termite damage?An important point about your contract concerns damage. Many people assume that their contract automatically covers damage repairs, but that is not always the case. Many termite protection contracts offer “retreatment only”, i.e., the pest control company will retreat areas as necessary in order to correct the problem, but the retreatment is all they are obligated to do under the terms of this type of contract. Other contracts cover a retreatment as well as the cost of repairs to wood or other structural components that are damaged by the termites. These contracts may have a higher annual renewal fee than a “retreat-only” contract. While a repair warranty may be an important option to you, but it’s important to understand the limits of the repair coverage. If your house is infested when you have it treated, then you should assume that there could be hidden damage, e.g., to wood framing behind a wall.

Read your contract carefullyIf you have had the contract since the house was built (and presumably it was not built with termite damaged wood), then any damage should be covered by the terms of the contract. However, this also assumes that you have upheld your part by not disrupting the treated soil or allowing termite-favorable conditions to develop on/around your home. On the other hand, if you buy an previously-owned home that has not had a contract (regardless of when it was last treated), then the contract likely excludes “existing damage.” What does that mean? For example, if in the course of renovating your house you find termite damage behind a wall but there are no termites found, then this situation is usually considered to be “existing damage” (i.e., prior to the start of your contract with the pest control company). Therefore, it is excluded from your repair guarantee because there is no way to determine if the damage occurred before or after the start of your contract. We are not aware of any scientifically sound way to precisely determine the age of termite damage. This exclusion is not simply an excuse for the company to avoid their contractual obligations to you. This is a legitimate issue that you need to understand clearly and should have it explained to you BEFORE you sign the contract.

For your own protection, make sure you receive (and keep) records provided to you by the company. Also, if you sell your house, you should pass these records onto the buyer. Important records to keep include:

One other important point of note. Your termite protection contract is strictly that – a contract for termites and termite control. Unless specified otherwise, your contract does not include inspections or coverage for other wood-damaging pests, such as carpenter ants, carpenter bees, powderpost beetles or wood-decaying fungi (although the inspector may note such problems and bring them to your attention). For additional advice on consumer protection and your termite contract, read the publication A Homeowner’s guide to Termite Control Service Agreements and Warranties by the North Carolina Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services.

A thorough inspection of the house is needed before treating for termites.

Michael Waldvogel – NCSU – Entomology

A termite inspection should include a diagram showing the location of any damage.

Michael Waldvogel – NCSU – Entomology

Current North Carolina Building Code requires that all residential structures under construction have some sort of termite protective treatment. The particular type termite treatment does not have to be a liquid treatment. It is a matter of choice by the builder and/or property owner but it must be a method approved by the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

As mentioned previously, modern termiticides applied properly to the soil are typically effective for 5-10 years. This doesn’t mean that after 5 or 10 years every termite in the neighborhood makes a mad rush at your house. It’s simply that the odds favor the termites eventually finding their way in at some point, depending in large part on how you maintain your house and property.

“Booster Treatments”As mentioned earlier, EPA currently requires that liquid termiticides be effective for at least 5 years. This in no way means that the chemical is completed gone after five years. Many people wonder if they need to have their house retreated for termites after a certain number of years have passed. If you have a termite protection contract, some companies may require a “booster treatment” after some period of time in order to maintain your guarantee. Such a requirement would be specified in your original contract; so read your contract carefully BEFORE signing it. These treatments are usually partial retreatments, such as just treating the soil around the foundation. More importantly for you, the cost for this treatment is usually not covered by your current contract and you will have to pay for the work (often $600-$1200, depending on the size and complexity of the construction). If you decide to discontinue your contract you’ll either be without a termite protection policy or you will need to find another company which may or may not require a similar treatment. At that point, you’re back “square one” and evaluating what type of service and contract the company (or companies) offer. As an option to having a booster treatment, the company may offer to continue your current contract but at a significantly higher annual renewal (perhaps 25%-50% higher). Again, read your current contract to see if there are terms concerning booster treatments and/or increases in your annual fee.

An important point to consider if you need to decide on getting a booster treatment or switching companies – if you currently have a repair warranty and want to continue with one, you will again have the exclusion of “current/old” damage if you switch companies. In general, if a repair contract is that important to you AND you have had your house under continuous contract with the same company since the day it was built, then you’re probably better off staying with that original company because ANY termite damage that is found must have occurred during the period of your coverage and therefore it IS covered by your repair warranty.

Other than with a contract requirement, a pest control company may only suggest that you get a termite treatment if you do not have an identified termite problem. They cannot tell you that need one. If you don’t have a termite problem, then a preventive treatment is a matter of YOUR choice. You can follow the old adage of “if it ain’t broke…..” However, it falls to you to be responsible for knowing “when it’s broke”, which is why annual inspections are valuable. You can simply wait until a problem occurs and then have a treatment done at that time. On the other hand, if it would make you sleep better at night knowing that your house has been treated and you have some sort of contract, then it’s your money, your house, your decision.

Non-Chemical Control of TermitesAlternatives to chemical control of termites (i.e., to control an active infestation) are very limited. Long term, non-chemical approaches to termite control focus on prevention. Here are a few approaches that may help with, but not necessarily prevent or likely eliminate, an active termite infestation.

Mud Tube RemovalState regulations require pest control operators to remove termite tubes as part of a complete liquid termite treatment. Removing the tubes provides a way to determine if a termite infestation remains active after treatment or if the termites reappear in the same area later. Scraping away mud tubes as the sole means of control can be impractical and is probably unwise in many cases (such as with slab construction where much of the termite activity may be inaccessible). The tubes are an indication that termites are active around the house. What you can’t easily determine, even with a careful inspection, is whether termites may be active in a foundation or wall void or some other visually inaccessible area of your home.

Debris RemovalAlthough it’s convenient, it is not a good idea to turn your crawlspace into a general storage area, particularly for items made of wood, cardboard or paper which can serve as food for termites. The same problem arises when tree stumps are left under houses during construction. State regulations require that liquid termite treatments (but not bait treatments) include the removal cellulose debris of a size that can be removed with an ordinary garden rake. Removing the debris helps reduce food resources that could be used by termites. This topic is discussed under preventive measures.

Mechanical BarriersA great deal of research is going on concerning termite-resistant building materials, such as “Termi-Mesh.” However, in most cases, these materials are most easily (or only) installed in new construction; however, some materials can be fit to existing houses (although the cost may be significant.)

If you are not satisfied with the service you are getting from a pest control company or you feel that your questions are not being answered, you have some recourse. First, you should always talk to the company’s manager or owner to make sure that the problem is not simply a matter of misunderstanding or miscommunication between you and the technician servicing your house or that the service person is not accurate in explaining details. If you’re still not satisfied with the response you receive from the company, then contact the North Carolina Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (919-733-6100) for assistance.

See the following websites:

Publication date: June 20, 2017

Recommendations for the use of agricultural chemicals are included in this publication as a convenience to the reader. The use of brand names and any mention or listing of commercial products or services in this publication does not imply endorsement by NC State University or N.C. A&T State University nor discrimination against similar products or services not mentioned. Individuals who use agricultural chemicals are responsible for ensuring that the intended use complies with current regulations and conforms to the product label. Be sure to obtain current information about usage regulations and examine a current product label before applying any chemical. For assistance, contact your local N.C. Cooperative Extension county center.

North Carolina State University and North Carolina A&T State University commit themselves to positive action to secure equal opportunity regardless of race, color, creed, national origin, religion, sex, age, veteran status or disability. In addition, the two Universities welcome all persons without regard to sexual orientation.

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Termites – Biology and Control – Browse Popular Publications

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Pest Control & Termite Extermination on the Delmarva Peninsula

Posted: at 7:40 am

Expert Pest Control and Termite Extermination on the Delmarva Peninsula

For thorough pest control and termite extermination service on the Delmarva Peninsula, contact Accurate Termite & Pest Control. Our team is highly experienced and very knowledgeable when it comes to ridding a building of pestsand we also are able to help you prevent them from returning once they have been eliminated. We understand that infestations are a terrible problem and our goal is to provide you with quick, effective help when you need it. Whether youre having an issue with termites, bed bugs, mosquitos, or other pests, our team is at the ready to banish them from your building. Our company can address a wide range of pest problems; weve helped clients with issues involving ants, termites, rodents, bed bugs, spiders, beetles, fleas, and more. If youre concerned you may have a problem in your home, hiring a professional is the fastest way to resolve the situation. Wed love to help you get things back to normal again as quickly as possible, or answer any questions you have about how pest control services work.

For thorough pest control and termite extermination service on the Delmarva Peninsula, contact Accurate Termite & Pest Control. Our team is highly experienced and very knowledgeable when it comes to ridding a building of pestsand we also are able to help you prevent them from returning once they have been eliminated. We understand that infestations are a terrible problem and our goal is to provide you with quick, effective help when you need it. Whether youre having an issue with termites, bed bugs, mosquitos, or other pests, our team is at the ready to banish them from your building. Our company can address a wide range of pest problems; weve helped clients with issues involving ants, termites, rodents, bed bugs, spiders, beetles, fleas, and more. If youre concerned you may have a problem in your home, hiring a professional is the fastest way to resolve the situation. Wed love to help you get things back to normal again as quickly as possible, or answer any questions you have about how pest control services work.

If you are experiencing a pest infestation, please dont wait to get some professional help; the longer it goes on, the more work it is to resolve. Our trained staff is able to come out and assess your situation and make recommendations based on what they find. Once we have completed any treatment, we will also make some suggestions for further preventative measures. Prevention is the best form of pest control. Its always easier to block pests from getting a foothold than it is to get rid of them once theyve established themselves. It is also a cheaper remedy, costing far less than an extensive removal effort. Accurate Termite & Pest Control is here to help you with your pest control and termite extermination needsincluding preventative services. Please contact our friendly, knowledgeable team at the office today to schedule service or ask any questions you may have. We serve customers throughout the Delmarva Peninsula.

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Pest Control & Termite Extermination on the Delmarva Peninsula

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Black Widow Termite and Pest Control in Manhattan New York

Posted: September 4, 2018 at 9:41 pm

At Black Widow, we pride ourselves on our devotion to Integrated Pest Management (IPM), and exceptional customer service!

We work with our customers to create and maintain, a clean, de-cluttered environment, free of holes and cracks in the structure, that help control pests, and reduce exposure to pesticides. We are commited to Integrated Pest Management (IPM). We use our knowledge about pests to prevent pest situations by identifying and eliminating conditions conducive to their survival. We implement proactive strategies, always encouraging the highest standards of cleaning and construction. Our goal is to reduce chemical applications by educating the client on preventative maintenance through proper cleaning procedures.

Our Green Shield Certified service is an option for all of our clients in which we use pesticides as a last resort and only after carefully selecting Green Shield Certified pesticides to minimize toxicity and potential exposure to people, pests and the environment.

Black Widow Termite & Pest Control Corp. employs technicians who are serious about controlling pestsituations. Our technicians take pride in their work and make ittheir goal to locate and eliminate the source of the situation with as little pesticide use as possible. We are determined and work with our clients until the problem is solved!

We do everything in our power to reduce the extra costs of pest control by educating the client on how they can help themselves by cleaning!

212.933.1834

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Black Widow Termite and Pest Control in Manhattan New York

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25 Best Pest Control Companies – Fairfax VA | Exterminators

Posted: at 9:41 pm

Project: Pest Control – Bugs & Insects

Date: 09/03/2018

What kind of location is this?: Home/Residence

Type of Insects: Bees, Hornets or Wasps

Is this an emergency?: No

Request Stage: Planning & Budgeting

Desired Completion Date: Timing is flexible

Comment: Bees are entering our attics near roof line on 3rd story

Project: Pest Control – Bugs & Insects

Date: 08/2018

What kind of location is this?: Home/Residence

Type of Insects: Bees, Hornets or Wasps

Desired Project Start Date: Tomorrow

Project: Pest Control – Bugs & Insects

Date: 08/2018

What kind of location is this?: Home/Residence

Type of Insects: Ants, Cockroaches, Spiders, Other

Is this an emergency?: No

Type of Control Service: Recurring pest control service

Square footage of home:: More than 3000

Request Stage: Ready to Hire

Desired Completion Date: Timing is flexible

Comment: silverfish/mice/

Project: Control or Eliminate Rodents

Date: 08/2018

Rodent Types: Don’t Know

Specific Problem: Excessive noise

What kind of location is this?: Home/Residence

Desired Project Start Date: Tomorrow

Comment: Scratching sounds coming from behind or inside kitchen cabinets

Project: Pest Control – Bugs & Insects

Date: 08/2018

What kind of location is this?: Home/Residence

Type of Insects: Ants, Beetles, Cockroaches, Fleas

Is this an emergency?: No

Request Stage: Planning & Budgeting

Desired Completion Date: Within 1 week

Project: Control or Eliminate Rodents

Date: 08/2018

Request Stage: Planning & Budgeting

Desired Completion Date: Timing is flexible

What kind of location is this?: Home/Residence

Request is for Commercial Location: No

Comment: scratching in basement walls

Project: Pest Control – Bugs & Insects

Date: 08/2018

What kind of location is this?: Home/Residence

Type of Insects: Cockroaches

Is this an emergency?: No

Type of Control Service: Recurring pest control service

Square footage of home:: Less than 1,000

Request Stage: Ready to Hire

Desired Completion Date: Within 1 week

Comment: Help with Pest control – eliminate any pests

Project: Pest Control – Bugs & Insects

Date: 08/2018

What kind of location is this?: Home/Residence

Desired Project Start Date: Today

Comment: Wasps entering siding of house. Makes their way into basement furnace room.

Project: Control or Eliminate Small Animals

Date: 08/2018

What kind of location is this?: Home/Residence

Is this an emergency?: No

Small Animal Types: Don’t Know

Request Stage: Ready to Hire

Desired Completion Date: Within 1 week

Comment: in the evening there are scratching sounds in the walls of the upstairs master bedroom/hallway

Project: Pest Control – Bugs & Insects

Date: 08/2018

What kind of location is this?: Home/Residence

Type of Insects: Don’t Know

Is this an emergency?: No

Type of Control Service: One time extermination

Square footage of home:: Less than 1,000

Request Stage: Ready to Hire

Desired Completion Date: Within 1 week

Comment: We need a treatment of the kitchen and bathroom in our ground floor apartment.

See the article here:
25 Best Pest Control Companies – Fairfax VA | Exterminators

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Home | Thrasher Termite and Pest Control — Best in San Diego

Posted: August 24, 2018 at 11:41 am

There are no unique real estate disclosures with regard to Formosan subterranean termite in La Mesa, or anywhere else in California. Thrasher Termite & Pest Control posed this disclosure question to real estate attorney and real estate broker, Jeffrey B. Hare.

The disclosure requirements for real estate are very simple. A good rule to follow is, If you know it, disclose it, said Mr. Hare.Otherwise, its always a good idea for the buyer to get a professional inspection by a licensed, reputable company. Lets face it, most homeowners are not qualified to identify evidence of damage from wood destroying pests, let alone distinguish between western subterranean, drywood or Formosan termites. Moreover, the costs of expenses and treatment are minor compared to the expenses of not dealing with the issue in a timely manner.

Formosan subterranean termites are controllable. While a Formosan termite colony possess the ability to cause extreme destruction, that destruction is only caused when the problem is unidentified, misidentified, or ignored. A monitoring and prevention program within the Formosan subterranean termite hot spot, and surrounding areas, are the best way to prevent destruction to your property. Pest control professionals have been dealing with Formosan subterranean termites in Louisiana since the 1960s and Florida since the 1980s. This invasive termite species is found in Hawaii, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Virginia, Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Florida, and Tennessee, and now, California.

Thrasher Termite & Pest Control, along with other professional pest management companies, use scientifically proven control methods for monitoring, preventing and controlling Formosan subterranean termites. Our goal is to protect your home and your home value by staying one step ahead of the Formosan subterranean termites in La Mesa. A strong prevention program is a positive point to disclose!

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Home | Thrasher Termite and Pest Control — Best in San Diego

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The Termite Danger Of Stucco And Veneer | Pest Cemetery

Posted: August 18, 2018 at 11:41 pm

A mans home is his castle or so the saying goes. With that mind picture, its easy to think of our fortress as impenetrable. After-all, a castle is built with thick stone walls, a moat that surrounds it and a huge draw bridge that when closed makes an unbreakable doorway.

The difference is, castles of old are made with real carved stones and huge guard towers to keep enemies at bay. Our modern day homes however, are truly just a facade that for the most part, look solid, but are really very porous when it comes to protection against termite entry and damage.

For the most part termite entry points on a home are caused by just 2 reasons.

#1- Over time homes settle, cracks develop, water pools in the 1/2 stopped up gutter etc. and termites take advantage of this wear and tear.

#2- We build them in. At times sloppy construction work leaves gaps, cracks or pathways where anything from a mouse to a roach can find its way in let alone the subterranean termite who only needs 1/64th of an inch and he can begin his assault on your castle.

One major default that allows termite entry has always been stuccos and veneers. The problem is that this thin skinned covering gives the termite protection from its enemies and allows them to go undetected by the homeowner and even the termite inspector sometimes for years. This is especially true when the stucco/veneer goes below soil grade or cement levels. When this happens, not only is it even easier for the light adverse blind termite to go above and below ground with ease, theyre also actually attracted to the area because of the moisture so often associated with the area. Once they latch on to an spot like this, serious damage is often the result because they have nothing impeding their feeding and may not be noticed until significant damage is done.

The following video is an example of stucco and veneers where a home has been treated but the termite were able to continue attacking and were obviously overlooked for quite some time.

Continued here:
The Termite Danger Of Stucco And Veneer | Pest Cemetery

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Pest Control Services in Alexandria, VA – HomeAdvisor.com

Posted: August 12, 2018 at 8:40 pm

Project: Pest Control – Bugs & Insects

Date: 08/12/2018

Request Stage: Ready to Hire

Desired Completion Date: Timing is flexible

Project: Pest Control – Bugs & Insects

Date: 08/12/2018

What kind of location is this?: Home/Residence

Is this an emergency?: No

Request Stage: Ready to Hire

Desired Completion Date: Timing is flexible

Project: Control or Eliminate Rodents

Date: 08/12/2018

Rodent Types: Mice

Specific Problem: Rodent waste, Nesting, Health concerns, Other

What kind of location is this?: Home/Residence

Recurring Service Requested: No

Desired Project Start Date: Tomorrow

Comment: The internet wiring has left a hole in the wall which allows the mice to enter the house. It needs to be sealed.

Project: Pest Control – Bugs & Insects

Date: 08/11/2018

What kind of location is this?: Home/Residence

Is this an emergency?: No

Type of Control Service: One time extermination

Square footage of home:: Less than 1,000

Request Stage: Ready to Hire

Desired Completion Date: Timing is flexible

Comment: I have two lawn mower bags stored on top of small plastic shed. Yellow jackets appear to be nested in the lawn mower bags. Each time I go the shed, I get attacked.

Project: Control or Eliminate Small Animals

Date: 08/11/2018

What kind of location is this?: Home/Residence

Is this an emergency?: No

Small Animal Types: Other Small Animals

Request Stage: Planning & Budgeting

Desired Completion Date: Within 1 week

Project: Pest Control – Bugs & Insects

Date: 08/10/2018

What kind of location is this?: Home/Residence

Type of Insects: Ants, Cockroaches, Mosquitos, Spiders

Desired Project Start Date: Within a few weeks

Comment: Crickets, roaches, tiny ants in basement and kitchen and garage

Project: Pest Control – Bugs & Insects

Date: 08/10/2018

What kind of location is this?: Home/Residence

Desired Project Start Date: Within a few weeks

Project: Control or Eliminate Small Animals

Date: 08/10/2018

What kind of location is this?: Home/Residence

Is this an emergency?: No

Small Animal Types: Squirrels, Other Small Animals

Request Stage: Ready to Hire

Desired Completion Date: Within 1 week

Comment: Seems like there is an invasion of some sort in the kitchen ceiling or between floors.

Project: Pest Control – Bugs & Insects

Date: 08/08/2018

What kind of location is this?: Home/Residence

Is this an emergency?: No

Request Stage: Planning & Budgeting

Desired Completion Date: Timing is flexible

Project: Control or Eliminate Small Animals

Date: 08/07/2018

What kind of location is this?: Home/Residence

Is this an emergency?: No

Location of Problem: Attic

Request Stage: Ready to Hire

Desired Completion Date: Timing is flexible

Comment: animal in attic, believed to be a squirrel and have stains in ceiling

Link:
Pest Control Services in Alexandria, VA – HomeAdvisor.com

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Arizona – Termite Public Service

Posted: at 8:40 pm

9535 East Doubletree Ranch Rd,Scottsdale, AZ 85258-5514

800-223-0618 (AZ residents only)

Arizona Office of Pest Management

1688 W AdamsPhoenix, AZ 85007(800) 223-0618(602) 255-3664(602) 542-3579

http://www.azda.gov/

http://www.azdeq.gov/

The following is a selection from the Arizona State Code related to Termite Treatment Licensing.

http://www.azleg.state.az.us/ars/32/01160.htm

http://www.azleg.state.az.us/ars/32/02323.htm

http://www.sb.state.az.us/PDFDocuments/Laws&Rules/OPM_Statutes7-07-08.pdf

32-2323. Wood-destroying insects; treatment proposal; registration form; fee

A. A business licensee shall not commence work on a contract or sign, issue or deliver any documents expressing an opinion or making a statement relating to the presence or absence of wood-destroying insects in a structure until an inspection is made.

B. Only an applicator or qualifying party licensed in the categories of wood-destroying insect management and wood-destroying insect inspection shall prepare a treatment proposal on a form approved by the acting director and shall deliver a copy of the treatment proposal to the person requesting the proposal, or the persons designated agent, before beginning treatment. The treatment proposal shall include the following information:

1. The address of the property to be treated.

2. A statement describing that the work is preventative or corrective.

3. A statement describing the evidence of infestation or damage.

4. A diagrammatic description showing the nature and location of evidence of infestation or damage, or both, if applicable.

5. A statement describing the treatment or repair method, including the name of the pesticide, agent or device to be used and a diagrammatic description showing where the treatment or repair will be rendered.

6. The price for the work.

7. The terms for the service agreement provided by the business licensee.

8. The signature and license number of the person who made the inspection of the structure to be treated.

C. A licensee shall also give to the person requesting a proposal a written recommendation that verifies a particular problem and, in addition to the licensees recommendation for treatment, shall advise the person of alternative treatments and methods, including integrated pest management methods to alleviate the problem.

D. A treatment proposal shall not be in the same form or be construed as a wood-destroying insect inspection report. A treatment proposal that does not identify infestation by wood-destroying insects is not a binding statement as to the presence or absence of wood-destroying insects.

E. A treatment proposal shall be prepared by a licensed applicator or qualifying party who has received at least five hours of instruction from the office or an in-house education program of a business licensee on the subject of wood-destroying insect inspections. An examination on the instruction is not required. The business licensee shall keep a record of completion of the training and shall make the record available on the acting directors request.

F. If a business licensee performs a treatment pursuant to a treatment proposal, the business licensee shall maintain for five years a record of the treatment and the name and quantity of the pesticide used.

G. Within thirty calendar days after completion of a termite treatment or on the next business day after the thirty calendar days, a business licensee shall file with the office in a form or format approved by the acting director a complete and accurate termite action registration form and a fee as prescribed by the acting director. The termite action registration form shall include information prescribed in section 32-2321, subsection C, paragraph 11 and this section. This subsection only applies to the following:

1. Any treatments done before or during construction, including final grade treatments.

2. The first preventative or corrective termite treatment by a business licensee to a site. If the business licensee who performed this termite treatment performed the before or during construction treatment at the same site and filed a termite action report form with the office documenting the before or during construction treatment, the business licensee is exempt from this paragraph.

3. A wood-destroying insect inspection report.

32-1160. Claim for termite damages; notice and offer of settlement; applicability; definition

A. At least thirty days before filing suit against a contractor for money damages resulting from termites, a claimant shall give written notice to that contractor at that contractors last known address, specifying in reasonable detail the facts that are the subject of the complaint. Within ten days after the date the contractor receives the notice, the contractor may request an opportunity to inspect the premises and may make a written offer to the claimant that may include an agreement by the contractor to inspect, treat, repair or have repaired at the contractors expense any area damaged by the termites and shall describe in reasonable detail the kind of repairs or treatment offered. If accepted, the repairs or treatment shall be made within forty-five days after the date the contractor receives written notice of acceptance of the offer of compromise, unless completion is delayed by the claimant or by other events beyond the control of the contractor. Failure to provide a written notice or refusal to allow a contractor to inspect the premises for termite damage and provide a retreatment program shall create a rebuttable presumption that the damages could have been mitigated.

B. The notice prescribed by subsection A is not required if the claimant must file suit at an earlier date to prevent expiration of the statute of limitations or if the complaint is asserted as a counterclaim.

C. This section does not create an implied warranty or extend any limitation period. This section applies only to a claim for money damages to a residence or an appurtenance to a residence resulting from termites and for which suit is filed after the effective date of this section.

D. For purposes of this section contractor means a person or entity, including any subsidiaries, parents, partners or affiliates, that contracts with a claimant for the construction or sale of a new residence constructed by that person or entity, or for an alteration of or addition to an existing residence, repair of a new or existing residence, or construction, sale, alteration, addition or repair of an appurtenance to a new or existing residence.

Key Arizona Termite Cases:

Sheibels v. Estes Homes, 161 Ariz. 403, 778 P.2d 1299 (1989)

Hill v. Jones, 151 Ariz. 81, 725 P.2d 1115 (1986)

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Arizona – Termite Public Service

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