NYC Termite Pest Control Extermination Operators, Inspection, Fumigation and Treatment


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Giving air to earthworms and termites – Farm Weekly

Posted: September 6, 2017 at 5:42 pm

THE humble earthworm and termite took the spotlight in Precision Agronomics Australia director Quenten Knights talk last week.

Addressing the topic of Increasing N-use efficiency in CTF, Mr Knight was quick to point out there was more available soil nitrogen (N) and more ammonium nitrogen in a CTF system than a conventionally-cropped system.

While the subject matter was not well researched, he said there had been demonstrable data obtained from trial work by his company.

On the South Coast, earthworms are the major contributor to what we have found is a 50 to 60 per cent increase in available nitrogen from CTF systems, Mr Knight said.

Termites also are great contributors in other parts of the Wheatbelt.

According to Mr Knight, earthworms can produce castings equivalent to their own weight, every day.

So 100 earthworms in a square metre can produce the equivalent of 10 units of N, he said.

Typically, earthworm castings have a high N concentration than surrounding soil.

Earthworms are known also to increase nitrogen mineralisation through a direct and indirect symbiotic relationships with the microbial community (Mycorrhiza).

Termites also can show nitrogen conversion efficiencies exceeding 100pc.

In South Coast trials, we have seen earthworm tunnelling dramatically reduced in compacted soils, Mr Knight said.

In contract on one farm using a CTF system, there were an estimated 10.4 million earthworms a hectare or 1040 a square metre, producing an equivalent 104 kilograms a hectare of N.

Of course the context of Mr Knights talk related to a well-balanced farming system with a focus on diversity and enhancing soil, particularly with oxygen.

A lot of compacted soils are depleted of oxygen, he said.

Deep ripping helps to re-introduce oxygen and plant available oxygen is helping to reduce wide scale water-logging and soil biology returns (along with earthworms and termites).

Theres an old adage that goes look after Mother Nature and shell look after you.

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Commissioners scratch for answer to bed bug problem – Salina Journal

Posted: at 5:41 pm

By Jean Kozubowski Salina Journal

Bed bugs.

Just the thought makes some people itch.

They bite, and the bites can form red, itchy welts. Scratch a bite enough and it can become infected.

Bed bugs are classified as a public health pest. However, Saline County Health Department Director Jason Tiller told county commissioners Tuesday that since bed bugs dont spread disease, they are not considered a public health threat.

Bed bugs are small as small as a quarter of an inch reddish-brown, disc-shaped bugs that often hide in fabrics, along seams. You might not see them, but you might see small black specks that are evidence that bed bugs are around.

You can bring them home from hotels and motels, public transportation, theater seats or friends homes, Tiller said. The most frequent cause of infestation is used furniture and second-hand clothes and toys, he said.

At last week’s county commission meeting, Larry Mattison, of New Cambria, told county commissioners he had 10 to 12 cases of bed bugs in his rentals in the past year. He was frustrated, he said, because when people move to another house or apartment, they just move the bed bugs with them.

He left a mattress on the curb with a note warning people not to take it because it was infested, and someone took it, he told commissioners Tuesday.

As long as its not treated, its just going to get worse, Mattison said. Right now, its all falling on the landlords. There must be a way to track them.

Problem worsening

Treating an infestation costs $700 to $1,500, Mattison said.

A couple of local exterminators agree with Mattison.

Jason Hutchinson, of Smolan, representing World Pet Control and Sunflower Services, attended Tuesdays commission meeting. She said the bed bug problem keeps getting worse.

Right now, its mushroomed, Hutchinson said. It has been exponential in its growth.

Its getting progressively worse, said Mark Hassman, of Hassman Termite and Pest Control, by phone. Some landlords are getting hit hard.

Eleven years ago, he said, he hadnt seen any bed bugs for decades. Now, Hassman said, he sees them several times a day.

The consensus was there are no easy answers.

No ordinances

Tiller said he searched for and could not find any county, city or state ordinances concerning bed bugs, except for two from the Department of Agriculture. He couldnt find much searching other states laws; some didnt mention bed bugs.

What role do we have in this? asked Commission Chairman Monte Shadwick.

Cleanliness doesnt help, Tiller said; prevention is important.

Education is key

Public education is better at stopping or slowing the spread of bed bugs, Tiller said. He has posted information and links to websites for the Centers for Disease Control, Environmental Protection Agency and Kansas Department of Health and Environment on the county health departments website, http://www.saline.org/Departments/Health-Department.

He said it’s important that when people travel, they use a flashlight to search the upholstery and bedding, and use a soft-side suitcase. When they return home, they should put the suitcase and all of their clothes in a hot clothes dryer for at least 20 minutes. Heat kills the bugs.

Second-hand clothes and toys should receive the same dryer treatment.

Public education seems to be the next step, Shadwick said. We can continue to look and see whats out there.

Tiller said he would talk with city officials about getting information out to the public, perhaps with monthly utility bills.

Commissioner Bob Vidricksen summed up the feeling in the room: Ten years ago you didnt hear much about this. Its got me spooked pretty good.

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Take On This Termite Season With Able Pest Management, A Local Honolulu Pest Removal Company – PR Web (press release)

Posted: at 5:41 pm

Honolulu, HI (PRWEB) September 06, 2017

As summer is officially underway, Hawaii has begun experiencing the familiar troubles of termite season. Able Pest Management LLC, a licensed and certified pest removal company in Oahu, is offering free estimates and termite inspections using the latest technologies, detecting termites with moisture and motion sensors, along with safe prevention/elimination treatments like the Sentricon System and Termidor:

John Baraquio, founder of Able Pest Management LLC, says, Its important to recognize signs of termite infestation. Check for mud trails outside the wood in piles, hollow-sounding wood or papery wings near windows. He adds, We control both subterranean and drywood termites, but the subterranean termites are harder to detect and causes more damage. The Sentricon and Termidor are safe and effective ways to handle them.

Able Pest Management LLC also offers a 24-hour termite inspection policy clients and escrow companies receive a report within 24 hours of the inspection. Baraquio says, Termite inspection reports are usually required by lenders before real estate transactions can continue. Many companies take as long as three to four days to submit an inspection report, which delays closings for properties and causes an inconvenience to all parties. At Able Pest Management, we guarantee youll receive the report within 24 hours.

Able Pest Management has been serving residential and commercial properties around the island since April 2000, safely removing all manner of pests including termites, mice, rats, ants and cockroaches. We pride ourselves in building strong relationships with our valued customers, making sure they have peace of mind knowing that their pest problems are taken care of, says Baraquio.

To schedule a free estimate from a termite specialist today, or to learn more about Able Pest Management LLC, visit http://www.ablepesthawaii.com, or call (808) 953-2253.

About Able Pest Management LLC

Committed to absolute protection from pests, Able Pest Management is proud to represent high quality pest control in Honolulu, HI. We specialize in several services, including the inspection and extermination of: termites, bed bugs, roaches, ants, fleas and ticks, spiders, bees and wasps, rodents, and more. Our dependable extermination methods produce effective results, and we will protect your home or business against the threat of unwelcome pests. Call us today at (808) 953-2253 or visit us at http://www.ablepesthawaii.com for more information.

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Take On This Termite Season With Able Pest Management, A Local Honolulu Pest Removal Company – PR Web (press release)

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The Average Cost of Termite Treatment | Termite Treatment And …

Posted: September 5, 2017 at 12:47 pm

Termites are a common household pest that have the potential to cause a lot of damage. Fortunately, there are a number of different ways to combat a termite infestation, making the average cost of termite treatment relatively low. The cost of removing termites from your home depends on several factors, including the size of the infestation and how much damage the termites have already caused. Here are some things that might affect overall termite treatment costs.

There are many different types of termites, some of which provide unique challenges for exterminators trying to remove them from a property. Some termites live directly on the wood that provides them with food, but others live in large underground colonies. Wood-dwelling termites are generally easier to detect and their nests are easier to locate. However, they tend to cause more structural damage to a home more quickly than subterranean termites. Subterranean termites are more difficult to find and exterminate, but it takes time for them to cause significant damage to a structure.

There are several different types of treatments available for killing termites, including putting up a chemical barrier to keep termites from entering the house, laying down bait to poison the termite colony, and fumigating with heat or cold to kill the termites. Depending on the type and extent of the termite infestation, one or more of these methods may not be feasible. Chemical barriers are generally the least expensive form of treatment, while fumigation is the most expensive. Poison baiting generally lies somewhere in the middle. Since the house is often not safe for people and pets during the fumigation process, the price of alternative accommodations often makes fumigation the least cost-effective means of termite removal.

The average cost of termite treatment only increases with time, as termites are allowed to burrow more deeply and cause more damage. If you suspect termites in your home, call for your free home inspection as soon as possible. To schedule an inspection with the experts at Action Termite Control, call (877) 556-4131 today.

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Termite Treatment – The Big Green K

Posted: at 12:47 pm

The Charlotte Treatment Plan (this includes areas around Charlotte)

We will schedule a date and time, that is convenient for you, to perform the termite treatment. Our termite treatment includes creating a trench around the foundation of your home. Once the trench is ready, we will apply the appropriate termiticide within the trench. Any areas that have “live termite” activity will require drilling and treatment. Some cases may require substntial drilling of piers, voids, slab, and/or front stoops. Additional trenching under the home may also be required, depending on the circumstance.

A trained termite technician will do the work and it will be backed by a warranty that can be renewed each year to keep the termite protection on your home. In addition, our office personnel and field managers are always available to help answer any questions or concerns you may have.

Killingsworth Environmental is one of the leading Charlotte termite companies in North and South Carolina. We proudly offer Concord, Denver, Indian Trail, Matthews, Mooresville, Rock Hill, Gastonia and Charlotte termite control services and exceptional customer care.

Simply complete the FREE INSPECTION form on this page or call our office. Killingsworth will come out to your home and do a FREE Charlotte termite inspection and quote in writing. We will evaluate your termite situation and plan a course of treatment that fits your particular termite control needs.

Contact Killingsworth for Charlotte termite treatment (and all of the surrounding areas)

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Letter: New construction – Charleston Post Courier

Posted: at 12:47 pm

I would like to make a prediction. After working in the termite and pest control business for over 42 years and observing the type of condo and apartment construction springing up around the tri-county area, I believe there is trouble ahead.

Some of the buildings have flat roofs with very little roof overhang. There are three- and four-story wood-framed buildings with stucco on top of foam, OSB, (oriented sand board) or plywood wall sheathing.

Some of the buildings have faulty grade levels from the start. which will only get worse over time. Siding in contact with the ground is also conducive to termites. Minimum pretreatment standards (with a boric acid treatment only in most cases) is not going to be effective.

My prediction is that due to water intrusion and Formosan termites, many of these buildings will be destroyed. The builders will be long gone.

I dont think the architects and builders have a clue as to how bad it will be. I am amazed that this type of construction is still common. I feel sorry for the people who buy into the projects and will get stuck holding the bag.

Charlie E. Ledford

North Edgewater Drive

Charleston

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Termite Fumigation Treatments In San Diego, Orange County …

Posted: September 4, 2017 at 11:44 am

If your inspector discovers heavy infestation in areas that are mostly inaccessible, they may recommend fumigation. Fumigation is a three-day process and dates are set by mutual agreement.

You will be given a list of things to complete before fumigation can begin. It is the responsibility of the owners to ensure all pets have been removed (and kept away) during fumigation.

No. However, our licensed inspector will advise a full-structure tent fumigation if that form of extermination is necessary. Whether Hi-Tech fumigates or uses the microwave system, our service contract is the same. Based upon the nature and extent of termite infestation, Hi-Techs advanced technology could be your answer.

Rid yourself of termites in only 3 days with our formulated tenting process. With whole-structure fumigation using Vikane gas fumigant, theres no place for drywood termites to hide.

Vikane disperses throughout the entire home, even into areas infested by drywood termites that are hidden or inaccessible to pest management professionals. Vikane penetrates through the wood to eliminate all termite colonies. Once the gas has dissipated no harmful residue remains and your home is safe for re-entry.

The Fumigation Crew arrives and carefully seals your structure. Then Vikane (a common termite fumigant) is applied. Warning signs are posted and the structure remains sealed overnight.

The crew removes all tarps and the structure is aired out with large fans for a full hour or more. Doors and windows are locked and the structure is left unoccupied.

The licensed fumigator uses Interscan (a Vikane gas detector) to ensure safety for re-entry. A clearance for re-entry is then posted at the property. Where subterranean termites are discovered our termite extermination technician will trench and treat soil and/or drill through a slab foundation and pressure inject Termidor or other state registered chemicals.

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Termite Fumigation Alternatives in Tampa | Anti-Pesto

Posted: at 11:44 am

Drawbacks to Tent Fumigation

The most common way to rid a structure of drywood termites is tent fumigation, aka know as”tenting.” Although this method is very common, ithas many drawbacks, including:

First, the gas used for tenting is toxic. In fact, it’s the only product with a skull and crossbones on the label in the entire pest control industry. What does that mean for you? Residents must move out for 3 whole days!

Second, tenting puts many other areas at risk. The toxic gas can harm plants and cause damage to landscaping. In addition, all uncanned food and medications must be removed from the property.

Third, many homes are not designed to be tented. As a result, structures can be damaged during the treatment process. And since fumigation is a gas, there is no residual — which means it’s not even a long-term solution.

Here at Anti-Pesto, we offer a “no tent” option to getting rid of termites in homes. We utilize Bora Care, with the active ingredient of Boric acid, which safely and effectively destroys termite colonies. This odorless, low-toxic solution takes a little longer than tenting treatments, but is a permanent solution to drywood termite infestations. That’s because, unlike tenting, Bora Care has a residual effect that keeps it working. Plus,Bora Care is green, so you don’t have to worry about harming the environment, your children, or your pets during the process! Other advantages include:

After we inspect your home for drywood termites, we can begin the “no tent” treatment process, which goes like this:

Whats more, every single termite treatment that we offer is backed by our one-year warranty. That means that if you see signs of termites after we treat your home, we will return free of charge. We even offer no-interest financing for up to 36 months for those who qualify. If this is something you are interested in, give our office a call at 727-524-6333 for more details!

Ready to rid your home of termites? Get a free quote today!

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It has a history … – Palo Alto Online

Posted: September 3, 2017 at 11:45 am

Falling in love with a historic house is a bit like falling in love with a woman. You may notice some faults, but once you’re smitten, you quickly overlook them.

So says Sam Benzacar, president of Creative Habitat Inc., a design/build company with offices in Menlo Park and Los Angeles.

But to make sure those home quirks don’t come back to haunt you, it’s best to go into the restoration/renovation process with a detective’s eye, he said. That’s how he approached a recent project a 1903 Colonial Revival/Shingle Style home in Professorville which garnered a Palo Alto Stanford Heritage (PAST) award for design and implementation.

A deeper look at the smoky residue on the gutters revealed a long-ago fire that left the framing boards charred. Earlier homeowners had simply ignored the damage.

Under the three layers of exterior siding was rotten wood. The siding had been applied without the plywood sheeting and waterproofing required in today’s building code.

“It harbored humidity and rot that was there and gave it more. (It had) little oxygen to ventilate, so it kept rotting away,” Benzacar said.

Termites were evident near the foundation, where wood touched dirt directly. “Because it’s a historical home, it’s not the usual termite damage you’d expect … The termite has (had) much more opportunity to do substantial damage,” Benzacar said.

Nothing in the termite report gave a heads up to such extensive damage, he said, but that’s not surprising given the report’s disclaimers that inspectors were not able to access every nook and cranny.

“Those disclaimers are the Achilles’ heel. It wouldn’t be a big deal in a current home, but in a historical home they could be a huge difference,” he said. “The bottom line is inspections are there to monitor everything in the realm of normal, not historical.”

But worse than the termite damage was the effect of water and mud touching the wood framing, creating rot.

“The criteria of construction at the time was different, codes were different. In many ways it was built better, like framing and materials used were great. However, even if you put the best of materials and you lay them directly on dirt, exposure to termite and wet rot are tremendous, obviously. That’s where major damage to framing members were,” he said.

The lesson learned here is “with any remodel, expect the unexpected, but in a historical home, take it to the nth degree and also be much more investigative, proactive and go beyond standard inspection. Be a detective,” Benzacar said, advising potential renovators to hire experts to probe deeper. “People who move the house go under the foundation in order to raise it. They know what to expect.”

Bencazar has been designing and building homes since the 1980s, but this is his first historical renovation. Born in Israel, he came to the U.S. to study. Bencazar eventually finished medical school and began a general surgery residency at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, but he was perpetually seeking new challenges and thought he’d like to try neurosurgery, he said.

“Medicine was the ultimate. It was a lifetime project,” he said of his feelings at the time.

A trip to the West Coast in pursuit of that residency instead netted him a wife and a year off to try something new. He started by designing and building small homes in Palo Alto in the 1980s with another builder.

“I did a small home and it was a great success, then another, then expanded into bigger projects in Atherton. I became addicted to it. It was the peak of creativity for me,” he said. Along the way he self-studied architecture and design. Today he does much of the design for Creative Habitat, but is aided by licensed architects and interior designers.

He has found the same satisfaction in building as he derived from helping people through medicine.

He found the Professorville home a challenge. “Not only did we have to update the house, but we increased the size of it, added a basement, but still kept its true style to the point that no one would ever know the extent,” he said.

Benzacar began the work knowing that the new owners loved the home the way it is and loved its character. “We wanted to update it, tweak it, make it suitable to the family,” he said, while following the City of Palo Alto’s rules for working on older homes.

“Changing anything in windows and doors was out of the question. The faade was a given, but that doesn’t affect the floor plan. Then we worked backwards. The biggest question was whether to include a basement under the existing structure,” he said.

“It opens the renovation, expansion into a new realm. In order to move it, we had to make sure it’s secure, that the structure is not going to collapse on you while you’re moving it, raising it, etc. That psychologically prepared all of us that it would not be a minor project,” he added.

As for the additional cost, Benzacar noted that “expense is relative to return. If you look at square footage that you added in Palo Alto and what they got in return, there was zero investment in land. You’ve got pure gain of square footage, without affecting the exterior mass of the house.”

The renovation did allow them to fix an earlier slap-dash addition of a sun room and replacement of four or five kinds of windows. “Now the windows are uniform, coherent. We gave the structure a much longer life,” he said.

“What we did was took the addition, integrated it into a historical, more conservative look. We took it to a better place, not only structurally but aesthetically (which is) why we got the PAST award. We remained true to the original, but not true to the slopped-on addition that looked horrible,” he said.

Benzacar’s advice for those thinking of buying and renovating a historic house:

“They need a true reality check and not what they would like to hear.”

Benzacar said many buyers see a historical home and fall in love with it. Then they go through the motions of inspecting it and really don’t want to see more.

“If you want to see more, you’ll invest more … If you dig deep enough, there will be minimal surprises. That’s the key,” he said. “Be aware of what you’re buying into.

“You’re not only getting potential problems, but you’re getting a potential great prospect.”

Freelance writer Carol Blitzer can be emailed at carolgblitzer@gmail.com.

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From cruise ship brewmaster to hurricane hunter, these are some of our unusual jobs – Miami Herald

Posted: at 11:43 am

Whether youre like some 88 percent of American workers who say they are satisfied with their jobs, or looking for a new career, the jobs on this list may not be on your radar.

Colin Presby, brewmaster aboard the Carnival Vista (and the only one sailing on a North America-based cruise ship) crafts about 280 gallons each week in the shipboard brewhouse. Beer-making at sea requires foresight: Presby ships barley, hops and spices to a Miami warehouse ahead of each cruise and plans his beer menu a month in advance. Rough seas make foamier ales, so when the waves are roiling, he postpones the boiling step. Otherwise, the process is no different than brewing on land, Presby said except, of course, that he lives on board. That means he gets to know his patrons and their beer preferences over a week. And he gets to see new places.

Carnival Vistas brewmaster Colin Presby brews several hundred pints of beer for cruise ship travelers.

CARL JUSTE cjuste@miamiherald.com

Salary: Comparable to a land-based brewmaster, who makes about $45,000-95,000 depending on brewery size and experience, according to the Brewers Association.

Entomologist and University of Florida Distinguished Professor Nan-Yao Su has tackled some of the countrys most-perplexing infestations, including one at the base of the Lady Liberty. To count and transfer termites to his Davie-based lab, researchers use straw-like pipettes to, well, suck them up. Su, with a doctorate in entomology and 45 years of termite research experience, can mouth-pipette 200-300 termites in a single minute that will be used to study the bugs division of labor. One benefit: Su uses the termites natural social behavior to create a poisoned bait the insects share with their 100 million colony members, enabling extermination of the queen deep within the massive nests.

Dr. Nan-Yao Su works at his termite lab at The University of Florida-Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center in Davie.

Roberto Koltun rkoltun@miamiherald.com

Salary: Biological scientist salaries start around $32,000; an experienced Distinguished Professor may earn upward of $160,000, according to UFs publicly available salary data.

Being a royal or head of state comes with privileges and that includes moving to the front of the airport security line. Among those who smooth the way for them is airport protocol officer Rebecca Lugones, who uses her language skills (English, Spanish, French), international affairs knowledge and unflappably cheerful personality to guide diplomats, heads of state and royalty through security and customs in about 10 minutes. VIPs still have to remove their shoes and undergo regular security procedures, but they jump to the front of the TSA-preapproved line and wait in VIP lounges. Over her 23 years at the Miami-Dade Aviation Department, Lugones has eased the airport way for former President Bill Clinton, the Dalai Lama and members of the Rolling Stones. She tries to treat them like normal people, Lugones said. Quite a skill.

Rebecca Lugones, protocol officer at the Miami-Dade Aviation Department, is ready to greet one of many dignitaries that fly into Miami International Airport every day.

Jose A. Iglesias jiglesias@elnuevoherald.com

Salary: Around $65,000, according to the Miami-Dade County database.

When it comes to a hurricane, radar isnt enough. To get a real handle on a storms strength and speed, pilots for the National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration fly their Lockheed WP-3D Orion four-engine turboprop planes and Gulfstream IV-SP jets right into the storm. Qualified pilots must have airline transport pilot licenses, fly-along training plus nerves of steel to face gusts that can exceed 156 mph as they fly figure-four passes through the swirling winds. Sometimes they must navigate in pitch darkness, said NOAA pilot Commander Justin Kibbey. Data is collected from cylindrical sensors deployed from the plane; the information helps researchers better predict where the hurricane will go.

Kibbeys first foray into an eyewall was in a burst of stadium-effect lightening. … It makes you feel small. Youre insignificant, Kibbey said. You need to take a moment and respect where youre at.

Hurricane Hunter Commander Justin Kibbey pilots the P-3 airplane that flies into hurricanes. Kibbey is currently the director of the building at the the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric facility in Virginia Key. He holds a model of the P-3 that he flies.

Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com

Salary: A pilot with the rank of Navy commander, which Kibbey holds, earns about $106,000 in annual base salary, according to the U.S. Navy.

Those pesky little critters known as lice have been causing itchy scalps since the Egyptians, but Heather and James JJ OConnor guarantee they can get rid of them. Their Miami salon, part of the Lice Clinics of America network, promises urgent care for lice.

Clinicians treat customers sometimes whole families at once at their spa-like location, and also partner with schools to conduct lice checks. Heather, a former real estate agent, pushed JJ to start the business together after learning about the franchise networks technology, which avoids harsh chemicals in favor of a warm air tool that dehydrates the bugs. The location opened in March on Coral Way and now has five employees.

Lice Clinics of America Miami is urgent care for lice. From left, at back: Patricia Perez, 8, and Maryna Torrealba-Grinen, lead technician at Lice Clinic of America Miami, with Sandra Perez. In foreground: Heather Wilson O’Connor and Edward Perez, 6.

Roberto Koltun rkoltun@miamiherald.com

Expected business: A standard treatment costs $195, with budget options available starting at $120. Across the network, a typical store treats about 100 customers a week.

Riding the wave of the mermaid craze, Marina Anderson performs as a mermaid by day and a burlesque dancer by night. The goal is to make audiences forget shes holding her breath underwater, said Anderson, who began free-diving the age of 3. For the past 26 years, she has worked as an aquatic performer. The illusion requires acting and strong swimming skills: Anderson does underwater somersaults, back-flips, corkscrews and barrel rolls influenced by stunt flying. She draws choreographic inspiration from the late iconic aquatic actress, Esther Williams. Both the G-rated show and her more-risque version are at Fort Lauderdales Wreck Bar at the Ocean B Resort. She also goes on national tour.

Marina Anderson stage name Medusirena performs at the Wreck Bar, in Fort Lauderdale.

Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com

Salary: Anderson makes between $400 and $3,000 per show, depending on venue.

Carlos Martinez understands what it is to be biggest, fastest or longest-running. While working for Guinness World Records, hes overseen the largest ancient ceremonial Mexican dance, measured the biggest plastic tub mosaic and presented Floyd Mayweather with an award for Most bouts undefeated by a world champion boxer.

Martinez has spent 10 years working around the world for Guinness. As the companys new director of Latin America, he advises regional businesses and organizations hired by Guinness to support them in their record-breaking attempts. (It helps that he speaks English, Spanish and Portuguese.) More than 1,000 individuals, groups, companies and nonprofits submit applications globally for records every week, and businesses and nonprofits also partner with Guinness to generate publicity through record attempts.

Business: Last year, 800 brands set or broke record titles as consultancy-based clients, according to Guinness. The company customizes package prices depending on the clients goals and declined to provide specifics, but according to a 2013 Bloomberg Businessweek article, prices start at $7,500 and can go up to $20,000. Salaries at the private company are confidential.

A swarm of 5,000 bees on your property might make you panic but not Willie the Bee Man. No hives location can surprise him anymore: He has removed bees from homes, trees, telephone poles, flower pots, sailboat masts, barbeque pits and plane wings from Miami to Palm Beach. He once removed a hive the size of a Volkswagen Beetle from a townhome in Doral.

The queen bee, in the center, is among the casualties of hive extraction on Aug. 9. Willie the Bee Man tries to save bees as he extract them from his clients home, but in this case, it was not possible because the extraction required breaking underneath the roof, which caused many bees to perish.

CARL JUSTE cjuste@miamiherald.com

Willie Sklaroff has been keeping bees as a hobby for 26 years. After he registered as a beekeeper, Floridas Department of Agriculture began recommending him to panicky property owners with bee problems. He learned on the job and by meeting fellow beekeepers at monthly meetings. (He has also been certified for pest removal, and he attends and teaches continuing education classes.)

Originally, Sklaroff worked as a kindergarten teacher by day, with bee removal as his side gig. A 2003 Miami Herald article generated so much buzz that he moved into the bee business full time.

When he gets a call, he suits up in his protective gear and watches the bees to find their home. He always tries to save the hive if possible, calming the insects with smoke before exposing the nest. Layer by layer, he cuts apart the honeycomb and transports it to a safe location.

William Willie the Bee Man Sklaroff removes a hive from a clients home on Aug. 9.

CARL JUSTE cjuste@miamiherald.com

Business: Willie the Bee Man and his five employees attend more than 2,000 jobs a year. A bee removal can cost between $295 and $3,000 depending on the location and difficulty of the job. In a one-story house, removal is typically between $495-$695. The private company does not reveal salaries.

If your dog needs braces or your lion needs a root canal, All Pets Dental in Weston, can handle it.

Like many veterinarians, Dr. Elizabeth McMorran knew her calling from an early age. McMorran, a vet at All Pets Dental who helped on the root canal for Zoo Miamis 410-pound lion, got her doctor of veterinary medicine degree 13 years ago in Germany and her U.S. credentials at the University of Minnesota. She began specializing in dentistry after the word got around to fellow vets who were tooth-work averse. No one else wanted to touch the teeth, she said. Since then, shes worked on a mountain lion, a chimpanzee and plenty of pets, including cats, dogs and chinchillas. The practice is part of the Hometown Animal Hospital and does procedures including extractions and oral surgery, as well as routine cleanings.

Dr. Elizabeth McMorran looks at Bellas new protective crowns that she placed on the dogs teeth on Aug. 15. Several of Bella’s teeth have deformed enamel and the crowns will not only protect her teeth, but make them more comfortable as well. McMorran is a veterinarian who specializes in dental work at All Pets Dental, part of Hometown Animal Hospital in Weston.

Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com

Salary: Veterinarian salaries vary by region and typically made from $52,000-$161,000 in 2016, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. As specialists, veterinary dentist salaries are usually above the average.

If you saw Moneyball, youve got a basic idea of what Jason Par does for the Miami Marlins. Although he grew up a Boston Red Sox fan in Providence, Rhode Island, his playing days ended with Little League. To work in baseball, I assumed you had to have a relative who was the owner or you had to have played 20 years in the big leagues, he said. Then he read Michael Lewis Moneyball, and the former baseball writer with a bachelors degree from Yale in cognitive science and a firm grip on data thought hed found his niche. Today, hes the teams senior director of analytics. Marlins front-office meetings are a lot quieter and dont quite resemble the scenes in the 2011 film when nerdy Ivy Leaguer Peter Brand (played by Jonah Hill) spewed rapid-fire stats at Billy Beane, Oakland As general manager (played by Brad Pitt.) I try not to shout basically at all, he said.

Jason Par, the Marlins analytics director, at Marlins Park as the Miami Marlins get set to play the Los Angeles Dodgers on July 15.

AL DIAZ adiaz@miamiherald.com

Salary: According to glassdoor.com, major league analytics managers make from $103,000 – $115,000.

Barry Jackson

Originally posted here:
From cruise ship brewmaster to hurricane hunter, these are some of our unusual jobs – Miami Herald

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